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  1. #21
    polyglot's Avatar
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    Ymous: I understand that Supra is available as sheet but metallic is roll-only. FCA is now roll-only but I think someone in the UK is proposing to cut rolls to sheets commercially (looking at ag-photographic website)

  2. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by polyglot View Post
    I'd been told to use drums for the not-being-dark aspect of it all. I can try trays and if I don't bugger it up then that's cool.
    If you find it difficult to move the print to next tray, and don't want to put your fingers to the developer...: Use a very dim yellow led light carefully at the end of the development time. Then you can easily move the print to stop and blix, and at the end of development this dim enough yellow light won't do anything to the print anymore. It's completely safe this way.

    Next question on C-41: I'm assuming the print dynamic range is no more than 6-8 stops... do people do dodging, burning, etc on them to get stuff to fit on the paper? I guess you don't have much contrast control (barring the addition of sulfite to dev, etc) because that could change colours. Accurate D&B with 3ish second exposures sounds harder.
    Of course you dodge and burn, at least as much as in bw, if not more (because there's no easy contrast control)! 3ish second? Now where did you hear that . The exposures are about the same as in BW. Close the lens to f/8 and usually you have about 10...20 seconds for a 8x10" print.

    And, if you find the paper too contrasty and develop your own negatives, you can reduce the development time for negatives a bit to lower their contrast.

    And don't be afraid to add a bit sulfite to the developer. Then you'll have two developers, normal and lower-contrast, in two trays from which you can select for every print. Developer is cheap.

  3. #23
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    Rick at #10 was saying the paper is a lot faster. I can always stop down to f/22 but don't want the softness. I guess I can wind in all three filters for a bit of ND effect too.

    I like printing 12x16" as the RZ frame fits that very well and it's basically the size limit in our local comps. However, my 12x16 trays are quite fiddly and the paper can get stuck in the bottom, requiring vision and fingernails to retrieve. Actually I'm puzzled as to how you even grab the corner of a print with tongs and land it in the next tray blind. And how do you watch the clock?

  4. #24
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    Howdy Polyglot. Nice to see your still around!

    Very timely thread, as i have to admit that colour printing has been on my mind for a while too.

    In relation to safe lights (& sorry to hijack a little here), I was given one recently, with two filters. The horrible looking dark amber one, so I was told, was for colour papers. Is this correct? Or should I be avoiding at all costs? While, ultimately, I could learn completely in the dark, it would be good for a start.

    Cheers

  5. #25

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    I use the Colour Safe Torch from RH Designs:

    http://www.rhdesigns.co.uk/darkroom/html/safetorch.html

    Hangs round your neck I just use it to look at the clock. It's surprisingly bright when your darkroom is totally black.
    Steve.

  6. #26

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    Quote Originally Posted by polyglot View Post
    Ymous: I understand that Supra is available as sheet but metallic is roll-only. FCA is now roll-only but I think someone in the UK is proposing to cut rolls to sheets commercially (looking at ag-photographic website)
    Polyglot, supra endura is replaced by supra endura vc digital. The later can only be used in minilabs, not with enlargers. What is left of endura will finally be used and gone. The current endura papers can be seen here and the discontinued ones here (scroll down). There's also ultra endura, which is high contrast paper and edge, which is roll only. Fuji Crystal Archive is not the best option, at least when using kodak chemicals in room temperature.

  7. #27
    tiberiustibz's Avatar
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    Polyglot,
    Most dichro heads are dimmer than normal heads, giving them somewhat normal exposure times. I haven't had exposures run that short because I usually enlarge from 35mm to 11x14 which gives me 15 seconds at F8 on a beseler digital color head.

    I have burned once and I've been printing for 3 years. Maybe that's just the way I shoot my images but I haven't needed to.
    --Nicholas Andre

  8. #28

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    I use a Beseler 23C with a dual dichro head. For an 8X10 from a 6X7 neg, I use a three second exposure with an 80mm componon at 50m 50y at f11. Colour paper is MUCH faster than b&w. Granted, I have only used Supra 111, Supra Endura, and Edge. The newer Supra Endura and the Edge look very similar except for the thinner paper base of the Edge. The Supra 111 was old expired stuff, and was a little slower than the more modern stuff that is useable in optical or digital printing. My times are short since I also use the conical light integrator and condensors with my 23C. If you use a diffuser like most people do, you will find that your print times are more along the lines of 10 to 20 sec. When I need to dodge and burn (which is not as often with colour) I can stop the lens down a few stops. I don't see any difference in an 8X10 from 6X7 neg at f11 or f22 from my componons.

    Here's another trick I learned when using drums. The paper goes in to the drum with the emulsion towards the inside of the drum. When I dry the drum (literally push a tea towel into the drum, and give it a twist, then pull it out) there may be a few drops of water in the bottom of the drum. No problem. Leave the drum upright when you load it, and the few drops stay in the bottom of the drum with no effect on the paper. As soon as I lay the drum on its side on the roller base, I pour in the pre-wet and the whole mess is wet anyway. It works for me. I have never had any streaks on any of my RA4 prints. Whether it is because of the way I load the drum, or the type of roller base I use, or just $hit luck, I don't know.

    One more thing. Drums usually have slots on the inside with stuts that fit into the slots for different size paper. The paper is supposed to be placed in between the two struts so it will be held tight against the sides of the drum. I have three different types of drums at home, and I don't use the struts in any of them. I just put the paper in the drum, and put the cap on. The only time I would use the struts is when I have a couple of 5X7's in the one drum.

    Kodak makes a safelight filter for colour work which I use. I'd tell you the filter number if I was at home (#13?). It is really dim (probably just my old eyes). It is just enough to see your way around the darkroom. If I wait about 3 minutes, I can see enough to use a paper cutter and cut the Edge paper into sheets, with no ill effects on the cut paper. There are still some Edge rolls left on ebay for cheap. An 8"X610' roll is about $40 plus shipping. I bought three rolls for around $120 including shipping. That's over 2000 sheets!! I cut a few hundred sheets, and put the rolls in the freezer. I like the results of the Edge paper, and it sure fits in my budget. Filter packs and exposure times are very close to endura. Just my $.02.
    Last edited by ricksplace; 02-14-2010 at 08:01 AM. Click to view previous post history.
    Rick Jason.
    "I'm still developing"

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