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  1. #1
    Ektagraphic's Avatar
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    Archival Properties of Kodak's current Neg films

    Does anyone have any info on the archival properties of Kodak's current Portra and Ekar films. I am considering using them more but I am nervous that they might not be as archival as Ektachrome. Thanks.
    Helping to save analog photography one exposure at a time

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    MikeSeb's Avatar
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    I believe Kodak has designed them to self-destruct in 20 yrs to demonstrate its commitment to analog photography.

    Michael Sebastian
    Website | Blog

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    hrst's Avatar
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    Probably about the same as in Ektachrome, if not even better. You see, the requirements for dyes in negative films are easier because the masking can correct for unwanted absorptions. Or at least what I've understood. In addition, Kodak has had more R&D in negative films recently.

    And generally, old chromes are usually more faded than negs at the same time.

    In addition, it's said that current motion picture negatives can last well over 100 years with good color when properly stored.

    I would say; don't worry.

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    AgX
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    All published data I know of is more than 15 years old.
    I doubt that Kodak has released any figures on film longevity themselves within te last decades.

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    Marco B's Avatar
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    I think the biggest thread in the really long term is not only color fading, but the self-destruction of the cellulose tri-acetate filmbase still used for many 35mm films. Unfortunately, that stuff has a tendency to break down, causing the formation of acetic acid and its acrid smell as can be witnessed in some archives. It would be better if all films employed a polyester base, but one of the reasons I read that isn't used to much is that for cine-film, the breaking strength is to big and it might damage camera equipment if it gets stuck. Instead of the film breaking, as with tri-acetate.

    However, for normal SLR camera use, I think the stable polyester base would be preferable for long term conservation.

    Marco
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    "The nineteenth century began by believing that what was reasonable was true, and it wound up by believing that what it saw a photograph of, was true." - William M. Ivins Jr.

    "I don't know, maybe we should disinvent color, and we could just shoot Black & White." - David Burnett in 1978

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  6. #6
    BetterSense's Avatar
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    And generally, old chromes are usually more faded than negs at the same time.
    Really? My experince has been the opposite, at least with family photos.
    f/22 and be there.

  7. #7
    tiberiustibz's Avatar
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    The answer is most definitely longer than you'll be alive. I'm under the impression that modern E6 films are exceptional (100-300 years dark stability and 3 hours light stability) and I assume that negative films are at least 50 years.
    --Nicholas Andre

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    Quote Originally Posted by Ektagraphic View Post
    Does anyone have any info on the archival properties of Kodak's current Portra and Ekar films. I am considering using them more but I am nervous that they might not be as archival as Ektachrome. Thanks.
    patrick

    why don't you call kodak tech support ?
    they have all that info at their fingertips
    and can give you hard facts instead of opinions ...

    good luck!

    john

  9. #9
    Photo Engineer's Avatar
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    Older E6 are more faded than C41 or C22 negatives of the same or earlier. E4 slides fare a bit better. All of the E6 and C41 families were seriously upgraded in the 80s and 90s and the latest C41 were upgraded again about 2000 when the change from stabilizer to final rinse took place. The design of the latest C41 dyes resemble more those used in Endura paper which is quite stable

    PE

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    Ektagraphic's Avatar
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    Thanks PE. I was hoping you could fill me in. I guess I am going to kind of say goodbye to all of the Ektachrome I have been using and use more Portra and Ektar. I just love the look of optical prints and it is kind of out of the question for me to get Ilfochromes made at this point.
    Helping to save analog photography one exposure at a time

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