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  1. #11

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    Fuji 800Z probably gets the nod for mixed lighting, or if there's any fluorescent lighting. But the color saturation is a bit on the peppy side, but tastefully so. Portra 800 has less saturation, probably more accurate color overall, but will not react well to mixed lighting.

    Mostly, fast lenses is the key. Got your 35/1.4, 50/1.2, 85/1.4, 105/1.8, and 135/1.8 lenses? Remember, one advantage of your Nikon F5 is that it's not hard to rent lenses!

  2. #12

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    Quote Originally Posted by ted_smith View Post
    I am shooting a wedding for a friend this summer in July here in the UK. The ceremony is quite late at 15:00, and it's a traditional church, and quite a small one at that. The bride is due to be wearing an ivory dress. Both bride and groom are caucasian.
    I shot a wedding just like this last July. I used 400H and the prints I made were well received (I hand printed 10x8s for the parents / grandparents, the couple just accepted 6x4 machine prints). I used a weak flash to put pricks of light in the eyes. I didn't shoot inside.

    Bear in mind this is the UK in July. 50% or more chance of rain / overcast dullness, I'd say. I should think if you're shooting outdoors, 400H would be a very nice choice.
    Steve.

  3. #13
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    what didn't you like with the Portra just out of curiosity?
    I'm sure it was me and not the film. I just found the pictures lacked any punch and looked very washed out. I was using it to photograph police dogs and their handlers and so the contrast didn't really suit the theme. I used Ilford Delta 3200 B&W later in the day and they were brill. So perhaps just a bad choice of film for the event in question, but it put me off sufficiently not to use it again.

    I don't have a lot of lenses - standard 50mm 1.8, 60mm Macro, 20mm 2.8 prime and the legendary 80-200mm zoom. As was said, I will probably hire a 50mm 1.4 for the day.

    I am making the assumption (at this stage) that I won't use flash, but I have not spoken with the vicar yet so I may be able to. As it's quite a small church, if I can use flash I'll bounce it off the walls\ceiling.

    Well I think overall I have enough info to be going along with. In summary it seems most people would avoid the Fuji 800Z though no one has suggested an equivalently fast film that does offer the benefits of 160S, 400H etc? Is there any others?

    PS - re the format issue. If I had a Hassie I'd use that of course, but I don't, and I've never had the pleasure of using one, so I wouldn't dare use one at a wedding. I'd love to own one, but even today they are still quite pricey for anyone who's not got much cash lying around.
    Ted Smith Photography
    Hasselblad 501CM...my 2nd love.

  4. #14

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    Fuji 400H has been my standard film for many weddings.
    The more weddings I photograph, the more I appreciate the simplicity and quality of prime lenses. Why not use your standard 50 prime lens? I hardly use my zoom lenses anymore.
    If possible I use a tripod and a monopod for better mobility inside the church.

  5. #15
    2F/2F's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ted_smith View Post
    In summary it seems most people would avoid the Fuji 800Z...
    I did not get that impression at all from the replies. I would specifically recommend this film for the purpose.
    2F/2F

    "Truth and love are my law and worship. Form and conscience are my manifestation and guide. Nature and peace are my shelter and companions. Order is my attitude. Beauty and perfection are my attack."

    - Rob Tyner (1944 - 1991)

  6. #16
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    hey Ted,

    sounds like you already have a nice arsenal as it is! In a pinch though, I found that 400h pushed to 800 seemed to work out quite well. A little bit more contrast, but not all that bad.

    best of luck!

    -Dan


  7. #17
    Steve Smith's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mainecoonmaniac View Post
    I shot a wedding one time with Fuji Reala and the bride complemented me on how I make her skin look good.
    My father (and the photographer who employed him) would only use Reala for weddings because of it's ability to render skin tones correctly and make white dresses look white and black suits look black.


    Steve.
    "People who say things won't work are a dime a dozen. People who figure out how to make things work are worth a fortune" - Dave Rat.

  8. #18

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    Quote Originally Posted by ted_smith View Post
    ... I love to use Fuji 160S generally, ...
    Ted
    Use Fuji 400H for more speed. It's the same look but faster.

  9. #19
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    Most of my colour work is done in MF, but it may be good for you to know...

    Like most people, for me high speed colour film is usually hard to find in MF locally in a store. In MF speed is more important to increase DOF in normal lighted shots. Finding slower fine-grained film is easy, finding 400 iso is unpredictable.

    I was in a position of needing to higher speed film for some macro flower shots, which further impede the DOF. I have never even considered pushing colour before. So I took a roll of Ektar 100/120 and pushed it 2 stops. I was impressed on how well it turned out.

    With that, I loaded some Portra 160NC into my F601 (35mm) and shot at ei 640. Just around the house, both flash assisted and natural light. Definitely usable, especially high key.

    I process at home with a drum at room temp. I find room temp is gentler on the grain, but takes a while longer to process. I suggest you take the finest grain film you can get and give it a shot, assuming you can get it push processed. If not for anything else, to know that if you get stuck you have a way out.

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