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  1. #11

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    Quote Originally Posted by tiberiustibz View Post
    You need melenex base, some coating method, chemistry, dyes, paper, and the mordant/mordant coater (I think this is one of the more difficult issues.) If you have the time and money it can be done--it's a very simple process. Pin registration too...
    The mordant is mildly radioactive (thorium nitrate), but in J. Browning's pdf, he says that a plain fixed FB paper can be used, but sharpness will be affected IIRC. Making the film is by far the biggest problem.

  2. #12
    AgX
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    Quote Originally Posted by holmburgers View Post
    There are some cool resources on the web, and I've looked at them, but you can't ask a website a question, so here I am.
    http://tech.groups.yahoo.com/group/dyetransfer/


    And special receptive papers are offered/made by different manufacturres.

  3. #13
    holmburgers's Avatar
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    (AgX, I just joined! thanks!)

  4. #14
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    here's a video on youtube of the process.

    be aware: its old. and not very good quality, but gives you an idea of the actual printing process. NOT making matrices

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ktz4D13dHtw

    -Dan


  5. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by tiberiustibz View Post
    If you want alternative color processes you might try gum or "selectacolor." I found it on rockland colloid and it looked very interesting.

    http://www.rockaloid.com/products.html#selectacolor
    That print "example" looks nice. Well, it should be seen in person, but it seems different to most gum print scans I've seen; Hasn't got the paint character and looks colourful.
    I did a quick search about opinions and found one in another forum, doesn't sound as easy as it's written in their site.

  6. #16
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    There are many alternatives to DT and the materials are still available. This includes Carbro and Bromoil. The procedures are very similar but use more conventional materials. The results are less spectacular when compared to a real DT. A DT print uses dyes very similar to Ilfochrome, but with far more control and resultant brilliance. Carbro and Bromoil are more muted.

    PE

  7. #17
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    A really well done Dye Transfer print is something to behold, in my opinion it's the highest photography process. It's not something to pick up when you are retired as a hobby, it's complex and takes a long time to master, done alone you have a multitude of failures and work ahead. Even with the materials at hand it is not a simple one, two, three process. Without the materials that were used, matrix film, dyes, film, chemicals, it would take a great amount of time to produce a print.

    CJ
    Everytime I find a film or paper that I like, they discontinue it. - Paul Strand - Aperture monograph on Strand

  8. #18
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    Once you have a set of Mats though, you can whip out duplicate prints at a very high rate and this is also true to some extent with Carbro and Bromoil.

    PE

  9. #19

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    Quote Originally Posted by Curt View Post
    A really well done Dye Transfer print is something to behold, in my opinion it's the highest photography process. It's not something to pick up when you are retired as a hobby, it's complex and takes a long time to master, done alone you have a multitude of failures and work ahead. Even with the materials at hand it is not a simple one, two, three process. Without the materials that were used, matrix film, dyes, film, chemicals, it would take a great amount of time to produce a print.

    CJ
    i agree curt

    my uncle used to do dye transfers in the 60s, he was a master.

    i can't imagine figuring you are going to learn it in a weekend
    and rattling a few off soon after that, especially when the materials
    are not so easily found, and it is making things from scratch ...
    silver magnets, trickle tanks sold
    artwork often times sold for charity
    PM me for details

  10. #20

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    PE,

    What is the current situation with regard to availability of dyes for dye transfer?

    Tom

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