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  1. #1
    holmburgers's Avatar
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    Any practical way to do dye-transfer printing these days?

    Hi,

    So, in the pursuit of analog perfection, it seems that nothing comes closer than dye-transfer printing, at least with respect to stable color prints. It's fortunately very easy to obtain archive-worthy b&w prints, but color not so much, and thus is my interest in this process.

    However, I'm well aware that the Kodak materials for dye-transfer printing were discontinued when I was 11. Therefore, my question is, are there any ways to realistically create dye-transfer prints today, or a comparable process?

    What exactly is discontinued that was unique to D-T printing? Could these materials be "easily" synthesized or substituted? ("easily" being relative, of course)

    There are some cool resources on the web, and I've looked at them, but you can't ask a website a question, so here I am.

    How about carbro? How do they differ?

    I'm learning more daily, but I'd love to know what you know.

    I don't intend to go out and start doing this tomorrow, but I'm wondering if at any point in my life I can try my hand at this process.

    Thanks!

  2. #2
    hrst's Avatar
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    1. They promise that current Endura papers have at least 100 years of dye stability. These papers have evolved much.
    2. If this is not enough, you can consider Ilfochrome.
    3. Look at http://www.dyetransfer.org/ . They make dye transfer prints. There's a pdf manual about manufacturing the materials.

  3. #3
    Photo Engineer's Avatar
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    Both Jim Browning and Ctein make and sell dye transfer prints. Jim's web site shows you how to reproduce the entire process from start to finish.

    PE

  4. #4
    holmburgers's Avatar
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    Thank you, I have been to that website, and it's awesome no doubt. Maybe when I'm retired, I'll follow the instructions and make my own materials (I'm 24). I got a friendly PM from another member talking about the archival stability of current papers & I'm familiar with Ilfochrome. It's good to know that modern C-type prints are becoming more archive stable.

    Still, the allure of the visual quality is what, I guess, ultimately appeals to me. Plus the process itself is beautifully fundamental. A pure expression of subtractive color synthesis!

    I'd like to know specifically what materials were discontinued that are unique to this process.

    Thanks for the reply!

  5. #5
    holmburgers's Avatar
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    I just came across Jim Browning's site and I've printed it out. Thanks for the recommendation Photo Engineer!

  6. #6
    Photo Engineer's Avatar
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    Matrix Film and Pan Matrix Film are the primary materials used to make the print and they are no longer made. They dyes have been discontinued as has the Dye Transfer Paper. The process chemistry is rather easy to reproduce.

    In addition, the maskiing films and separation films no longer exist. So, you have to make do.

    PE

  7. #7
    Greg Davis's Avatar
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    I looked into this, as well, out of interest. The E-6 film to start is still made, as is B&W film for separation negatives. The developers for the separation negatives and matrices are pretty standard and easy to mix. The print paper can be made from unexposed and fixed/washed B&W paper, if I read correctly, but can be homemade. The dyes are no longer available, but can be mixed from scratch. It's mostly the Matrix film that is no longer available. Jim Browning has an emulsion formula for it, and Efke made some a few years ago, but there are no plans to make more as far as I know.
    www.gregorytdavis.com

    Did millions of people suddenly disappear? This may have an answer.

    "No one knows that day or hour, not even the angels in heaven, nor the Son, but only the Father." -Matthew 24:36

  8. #8
    tiberiustibz's Avatar
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    I asked Ctein and he said that if you can acquire materials he will teach you in a weekend. He doesn't want to teach people who will never be able to do the process themselves however.

    If you want alternative color processes you might try gum or "selectacolor." I found it on rockland colloid and it looked very interesting.

    http://www.rockaloid.com/products.html#selectacolor
    --Nicholas Andre

  9. #9
    holmburgers's Avatar
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    tiberiustibz, I will definitely look into this process you speak of, my interest is peaked!

    Ctein, yes, he seems to be the guru. That's good to know he'd be willing to teach however.

    I'm actually in the Yahoo! group now, and am in correspondence with Jim Browning. We'll see, it seems like such an awesome process, and despite the difficulty, surely there are some compromises that could be made to still produce SOMETHING that resembles a dye-transfer print.

    Thanks so much guys, it's been helpful!

  10. #10
    tiberiustibz's Avatar
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    You need melenex base, some coating method, chemistry, dyes, paper, and the mordant/mordant coater (I think this is one of the more difficult issues.) If you have the time and money it can be done--it's a very simple process. Pin registration too...
    --Nicholas Andre

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