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  1. #11
    Ektagraphic's Avatar
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    I am shooting 120 too so that is to my advantage too.
    Helping to save analog photography one exposure at a time

  2. #12

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    Quote Originally Posted by hrst View Post
    It starts to be a bit boring people posting here about every week with the same topic; "'SUP, I HAPPEN TO KNOW THAT ALL THE FILMS I USE DIE SOON". Hey come on, it's 2010 now, high-ISO digital cameras have been here for 5 years or so, they who are going to switch are gone years ago, they who shoot film will shoot it. (In addition, there's a growing interest as some people are discovering film for the first time, but that's a different topic.) Biggest decline and most severe discontinuations were in 2004-2005. You are 5 years late in panicking.

    There is a demand for higher ISO color films, they are used by lots of people, people buy them so they are not going anywhere. It's so simple. We may have less choices but the remaining ones are good, generally used ones.

    And well, an answer to your question, what happens after iso 800 is gone, then shoot what is available. It may be iso 1600 or iso 400, or that day may not come in your lifetime, who knows and what does that matter???

    Let's do the speculation when we first have some facts or arguments or interesting viewpoints to speculate about. Please.
    I used that same line of reasoning myself recently in another thread last week. You're right that digital is nothing new now and those who have switched already did between 2000 and 2008. And that digital is old now...yes, it is. However, it's evident that if anything, the next thing likely to go is going to be color film over ISO 400. The reason is that demand has been low for several years now compared to the lower speed film, and Kodak and Fuji may find it unprofitable to keep making. That is why Fuji almost discontinued 800Z this past Fall.

    And if and when it does happen that ISO 400 is the fastest color film once again, we need an alternate solution so as not to be blindsided. Better to start testing and prepping now, so it won't be an off-guard sort of situation later on, don't you think? That was the reason for posting this.
    Last edited by B&Wpositive; 02-21-2010 at 12:08 AM. Click to view previous post history.

  3. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by B&Wpositive View Post
    However, it's evident that the next thing to go is going to be color film over ISO 400.
    What would make you say this? I know that digital has been replacing the high ISO situation but those who shoot professional thing on film like wedding people, I would assume they use ISO 400 at least. Plus some people like myself may go out shooting for the day and go on an adventure that I have never gone on before so I shoot 400 since I don't know what might come my way.
    Helping to save analog photography one exposure at a time

  4. #14

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    Quote Originally Posted by hrst View Post
    I print both Superia 800 and Superia 1600 optically. Both look very fine. 8x10" prints from 35mm Superia1600 are very nice, graininess is not obstructive at all, and I like the color rendition very much. But well, there's not so much underexposure latitude, so be sure to meter well if you use it at box speed, or shoot at 800 if in doubt.
    Agreed. Scanned, Superia 1600 is grainier though.

  5. #15
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    I disagree with you. I cannot see that the next one to go is 800 ISO color neg. I just can't know that. It may be it, but it may not.

    On the other hand, I knew that TXP320 is used a lot less than TXP400 so it was logical that it was discontinued. But I don't see the same with high-speed color negs. There was many substitutes and it was a less used film. But as you say, there are no real substitutes for 800-1600 ISO color negs. My argument is that if they just are used at some level (as they are), there's no point discontinuing them.

    It's all about the size of pool of products to select from. There are a lot of ISO100 & ISO400 films so it's easier to discontinue some of the less-used one. Like it was easy to discontinue TXP320, because TX400, TMAX400 and TMAX3200 remains, let alone the other companies. BUT, there are less ISO800 films and only one ISO1600 film, so they sell better and it's more difficult to discontinue the only ones. This is my logic.

  6. #16

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    Quote Originally Posted by Ektagraphic View Post
    What would make you say this? I know that digital has been replacing the high ISO situation but those who shoot professional thing on film like wedding people, I would assume they use ISO 400 at least. Plus some people like myself may go out shooting for the day and go on an adventure that I have never gone on before so I shoot 400 since I don't know what might come my way.
    Because Fuji came very close to disconuing 800Z recently. That tells me that sales of film over ISO 400 are on the brink of not being profitable. It's similar to the situation that Kodachrome was in 5 years ago. This is the difference from being a realist and being overly optimistic. It could happen soon. We need an alternate method.

    ISO 100, 160, and 400 are firmly entrenched in the pro color neg film market. These are very popular speeds. And ironically, Pat, wedding photography is one key area of pro photography where there are lots of film shooters--either holdouts or those who dislike the boring nature or excessive computer time of digital. And ISOs of 160, or even 400 or even 800, don't cut it for low-light wedding work. You really need to get up over EI 1600.
    Last edited by B&Wpositive; 02-21-2010 at 12:19 AM. Click to view previous post history.

  7. #17
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    I even think that there may be a slim possibility that a new, higher-ISO film will be released by Kodak. My arguments;
    1) Digital cameras have high ISO values today and they are used in marketing, so, from a competition point of view, it would be wise.
    2) All the film shooters know very well the advantages of higher ISO. There are lot more film shooters than just landscape shooters, eg. "street" shooters.
    3) KODAK motion picture group has some new high-ISO films like Vision3 500T whose technology was used in Ektar 100. So it isn't impossible at all to see a new high-speed film with this new technology.
    4) Kodak doesn't have ISO 1600 color neg like Fuji. By the release of Ektar100, the selection is now balanced to lower-speed films.

  8. #18

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    Quote Originally Posted by hrst View Post
    I disagree with you. I cannot see that the next one to go is 800 ISO color neg. I just can't know that. It may be it, but it may not.

    On the other hand, I knew that TXP320 is used a lot less than TXP400 so it was logical that it was discontinued. But I don't see the same with high-speed color negs. There was many substitutes and it was a less used film. But as you say, there are no real substitutes for 800-1600 ISO color negs. My argument is that if they just are used at some level (as they are), there's no point discontinuing them.

    It's all about the size of pool of products to select from. There are a lot of ISO100 & ISO400 films so it's easier to discontinue some of the less-used one. Like it was easy to discontinue TXP320, because TX400, TMAX400 and TMAX3200 remains, let alone the other companies. BUT, there are less ISO800 films and only one ISO1600 film, so they sell better and it's more difficult to discontinue the only ones. This is my logic.
    High speed film, in both color and b&w are in danger and have been for at least a few years. Kodak P3200, for example, is rumored to be on the chopping block. I love that film. I shoot it at EI 6400 most of the time. High ISO is not just a marketing gimmick...it lets you get shots that you can't get with anything else.

  9. #19
    Ektagraphic's Avatar
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    Oops. I think I missread and thought you had wrote films ISO 400 and above not above ISO 400
    Helping to save analog photography one exposure at a time

  10. #20

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    Quote Originally Posted by hrst View Post
    I even think that there may be a slim possibility that a new, higher-ISO film will be released by Kodak. My arguments;
    1) Digital cameras have high ISO values today and they are used in marketing, so, from a competition point of view, it would be wise.
    2) All the film shooters know very well the advantages of higher ISO. There are lot more film shooters than just landscape shooters, eg. "street" shooters.
    3) KODAK motion picture group has some new high-ISO films like Vision3 500T whose technology was used in Ektar 100. So it isn't impossible at all to see a new high-speed film with this new technology.
    4) Kodak doesn't have ISO 1600 color neg like Fuji. By the release of Ektar100, the selection is now balanced to lower-speed films.
    I'm praying that you're right, or at the very least that the existing high ISO emulsions will stay around. This is what I'm hoping will be for as long as possible. But we need to prepare, just in case...have an alternative in the wings.

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