Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 70,526   Posts: 1,543,909   Online: 1057
      
Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 28
  1. #1

    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    373

    ECN-II film in still camera lengths - where to process?

    Kodak Vision 500T, etc look like great films. And the movie films are the last tungsten balanced films, too. But what lab would process them in short still-camera lengths? Let alone finding someone who will push process it.

    Or could one process them in C-41 chemistry in a Jobo? I guess not; I think PE warned against using C-41 chemistry with ECN II film because it won't be archival.

    What's the solution then? Short of mixing raw chemicals yourself? We're missing out on so many great films because we can't process them easily.

  2. #2
    tiberiustibz's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    Tufts University
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    1,750
    Images
    5
    ehhhhhhh...splice many many rolls together?

    I looked at this myself but then said "aha! Ektar 100 has been released...there's no need!" I was going to begin scratch mixing.
    --Nicholas Andre

  3. #3

    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    373
    Quote Originally Posted by tiberiustibz View Post
    ehhhhhhh...splice many many rolls together?

    I looked at this myself but then said "aha! Ektar 100 has been released...there's no need!" I was going to begin scratch mixing.
    How would you splice them? I wouldn't mind doing that actually to get enough to process. Like, shoot 20 rolls and splice them together to get 120 feet. And then send it all for processing as a reel.

  4. #4
    tiberiustibz's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    Tufts University
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    1,750
    Images
    5
    I think tape is out. Either with film cement or with those nifty hot splice ones. Sorry I've never tried it before.
    --Nicholas Andre

  5. #5
    Photo Engineer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Rochester, NY
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    23,015
    Images
    65
    The ECN and C41 process differ enough to cause problems for you.

    The ECN is 0.5 in contrast and the C41 family is 0.6+ in contrast. Prints will not be optimum.

    Good luck.

    PE

  6. #6

    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    373
    Quote Originally Posted by Photo Engineer View Post
    The ECN and C41 process differ enough to cause problems for you.

    The ECN is 0.5 in contrast and the C41 family is 0.6+ in contrast. Prints will not be optimum.

    Good luck.

    PE
    Can exposure in camera or developing time compensate for this contrast shift? Is archival stability impacted when processing ECN in C-41? Is there any other reason not to do it?

  7. #7

    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Horsham, PA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    751
    I believe that Wal-Mart still processes it via their send-out service, although the last time I looked was over a year ago. There should be a blue booklet next to the send-out box that explains all of their services. If it's not there, the lab "tech" should have it behind the counter.

  8. #8

    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    373
    Quote Originally Posted by nickrapak View Post
    I believe that Wal-Mart still processes it via their send-out service, although the last time I looked was over a year ago. There should be a blue booklet next to the send-out box that explains all of their services. If it's not there, the lab "tech" should have it behind the counter.
    Wal-Mart is a lost cause when it comes to stuff like this. I'll bet it's only for "movie film reels" if they even offer it anymore. But who knows if they actually do. Even if they did, I would not want to trust a commercial send-out service to handle the film.

    So maybe there's a way to do it in a Jobo with premade C-41 chemistry without the terrible contrast shift and without clogging anything up due to the rem jet...?

  9. #9
    tiberiustibz's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    Tufts University
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    1,750
    Images
    5
    ehhhhhh trust me it's more trouble than it's worth. I've had to clean out a dark closet of remjet gook before. Not particularly fun...If you really want you should mix your own developer--it's not that hard. But removing the rem jet will be a royal pain.

    Is there any reason you're opposed to using ektar? Or have you just been given a large supply of film and want to use it? Your results are not going to be particularly fascinating...

    Last time I tried to process movie film through Walmart I waited two weeks and it was handed back to me saying "service not offered." I thought it strange since the "book" they handed me offered it plainly...
    --Nicholas Andre

  10. #10

    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    373
    Quote Originally Posted by tiberiustibz View Post
    ehhhhhh trust me it's more trouble than it's worth. I've had to clean out a dark closet of remjet gook before. Not particularly fun...If you really want you should mix your own developer--it's not that hard. But removing the rem jet will be a royal pain.

    Is there any reason you're opposed to using ektar? Or have you just been given a large supply of film and want to use it? Your results are not going to be particularly fascinating...

    Last time I tried to process movie film through Walmart I waited two weeks and it was handed back to me saying "service not offered." I thought it strange since the "book" they handed me offered it plainly...
    Ektar is too slow for indoor wedding work.

Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin