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  1. #11
    RalphLambrecht's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by perkeleellinen View Post
    Thanks for all the replies. Just noticed Paterson also make an eight reel tank - I doubt if I could fit that into my changing bag.

    I'll have to do some thinking about the economics of all this as the 5-reel tank needs 1500ml of fluid to cover completely.
    Consider a hand rotation process! Cuts down enormously on chemicals.
    Regards

    Ralph W. Lambrecht
    www.darkroomagic.comrorrlambrec@ymail.com[/URL]
    www.waybeyondmonochrome.com

  2. #12

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    A German friend once taught me how to properly pour a bottle of Erdinger by rolling the almost empty bottle across the table before pouring out the remains to get a nice head.

    A proper electronic Jobo processor is beyond my budget and space. But I could probably adapt the Erdinger technique with one of these:

    http://www.bhphotovideo.com/bnh/cont...=REG&A=details
    Steve.

  3. #13

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    I've got a paterson hand rotation print tank that I want to use for film, that should take 5 reels ( it was about £8 on ebay). You just need to replace the top with a normal paterson film top and put in a 5 reel light trap tube to hold the spools.

    This sort of thing, should be able to find one cheaper but it's the only picture I could find.
    http://cgi.ebay.co.uk/PATERSON-8x10-...item19b9b1bf8b

  4. #14
    Ian Grant's Avatar
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    I've used these tanks since their release in the late 60's or early 70's, I don't recommend the 5 reel for colour work at all. It's not possible to pour the dev etc in & out fast enough with the short 3min 15sec time needed, I also have an 8 reel tank.

    My suggestion is the 3 x35mm (2x120) tanks these are much more suitable. Or a Jobo rotary system as they use less chemistry anyway.

    Ian

  5. #15
    Mike Wilde's Avatar
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    I use the '5 reel' tank for 2 reels set for 120/220 roll film when my stainless set is tied up with other things. Two roll film wide reels need only 1L of chemistry, and this is the size I normally mix c-41 up in.

    The other nice thing the Paterson reels are good for is their ability to load one 120 roll on after another (pratice first on scrap films (you do save scrap films, right?)). Double loading 120 lets me run 4-120's in one litre of c-41, somehting I cannot do wih the stainless tank and reels.

    I do this processing in a dip and dunk style, lifting the spindle off and dipping it into a jug of stop, and then rinse tank and pour in bleach while the spindle is in the dark in the stop bath jug.
    my real name, imagine that.

  6. #16

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    Quote Originally Posted by Mike Wilde View Post
    their ability to load one 120 roll on after another
    Now this is interesting. I've got loads of 12 exp Agfa film that I want to use but I resent having to pay the same at the lab for developing 12 exposures as for 36 exposures. I always wondered, could I load two or three 12 exp films onto one reel. It seems like this is possible. Is it easy to 'wind on' the film once it's passed the ball bearings at the start of the reel?
    Steve.

  7. #17
    Ian Grant's Avatar
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    You cant load 3 120's on one reel as tats far longer than a 36ex 35mm film/

    some people load 120's back to back, but it's a bad idea, but in theory you could load 4 120's onto a Paterson spiral. I value my films and stick to one per reel

    Ian

  8. #18

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    Ooh, I should have mentioned that the 12 exp films are 35mm.
    Steve.

  9. #19
    Mike Wilde's Avatar
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    I have done short 35mm add ons as well. I do this for my 35mm stuff as quality control.

    I take a film, set up a grey card, a color control card from a Kodak color darkroom dataguide, and persuade my wife to stand in front of the house on a cloud free day holding said cards.

    I meter, set camera on matching manual exposure, bolt tripod tight and wind off about 72 exposures over a couple of rolls as a constant.

    Then for each batch of c-41 I mix (I home brew this from base chemicals) I snip another 4" or so off one of these test rolls and add it onto a roll I am developing. For a long while I was/still am working my way thorough 100 rolls of Agfa Vista in 27 exposure lengths, so there is lots of room.

    I have used masking tape, but recommend splurging and buying film splicing tape. Mine is called Blue Max. It sticks to film base very well, but is not too sticky on anything else. My roll was $20, but I use it 1" at a time, so I have a lifetime supply.

    Practice with scrap films (see, there I go again) Keep track on where the the end of the film is as you load, and before it gets to the ball bearing gate lay the film tail down further back on the reel on the outside of the spiral, and then lay the new film to overlap by a 1/4" or so. Using the reel as an alignment template helps the film to go on in line in the dark. If it gets half way in and binds, you can undo and re-stick the take if using blue max. I fold a little corner over when prepping the tape in the light to do this. With the corner to tug with a finger nail you can make ginger adjustments. If you get really stuck, cup the film like loading a stianelss steel reel, and wiggle it past the ball bearing areas where it tends to snag when loading without the ball bearings.

    Trim the tag along film so the corners are chamfered, and the cut is square. Square corners tend to snag if not perfectly aligned.

    If you are not filling the reel, load the first short film, and push it along the spirals until it hits the core. Then start to load the second short film. There will be a length of spiral empty betwen the two films, and no need to tape on. I tape on because a 4" long film chip ends up coming off the reel and scratching itself and the films in with it if it is not tacked onto the reel in front of it. I have even taped onto and then had the chip dangle betwen the reel outside and the tank inside when I have a bit of a long bulk loaded '36' exposure film to process. The edges ge scratched, but I can still read the density of the grey card and colour of the test patches with the densitometer to judge if the fresh bathc of chems is similar to that which came before it..
    my real name, imagine that.

  10. #20

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    Thanks, Mike. As it happens I got a bulk loader yesterday (for £2.50!) and it's got a load of film in it. The previous owner thinks it's at least 20 years old, so I'm going to use that for practising short length loading on my spools.
    Steve.

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