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Thread: Ektar 100

  1. #11

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    I think I will give my observations on Ektar... I am a Kodachrome nut. I love deep colors, good saturation, and a good overall red response. I get that in Ektar. I even go so far as to shoot it at ISO 64 to boost the colors and make it look even more like Kodachrome. I do some product photography myself and this is what I think... If you are shooting products which use alot of red in the design or logotyping and an intense red would work, use Ektar. If you are looking for neutral or even subdued colors or in an instance where the red response would warm up the image too much, then use another film.

  2. #12

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    It seems that colour is not perceived the same by everyone.
    I have recently scanned a couple of architectural images that I took when the first Ektar films came on the market. The colours were slightly more intense but not over the top at all. After more than 20 years, the negatives produced wonderful scans.
    Thank you all for your input, it is much appreciated.

  3. #13

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    It seems that colour is not perceived the same by everyone.

    I recall reading - in a sociology text I think - about some Kodak research 40+ years ago in which they asked test subjects to choose the whitest white from a panel of whites ever so slightly tinted with different colours.

    Choice of "white" seemed to depend on the subjects cultural/ethnic/regional origin with Northern Europeans preferring blueish whites and folks from Southern Europe liking reddish or yellowish whites.

  4. #14

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    Quote Originally Posted by pentaxuser View Post
    I suspect that in colour there are few if any absolutes and the film demonstrating colour authenticity is simply conforming to my perception which may be the same as yours for most scenes so we agree but differs in other kinds of scenes and we disagree as to its colour authenticity.

    pentaxuser
    I think pentaxuser is on to something. Though we can differentiate between colors they can be very fluid things. Joseph Albers's studies in color would back up the idea that our perceptions of color have as much to do with how they look as the pigments themselves.

    That being said I really like the Ektar 100. I compared the results of a shoot with the subject and found that the colors were very accurate even though they "seemed" over-saturated. Use this film if you want to accentuate the color that is really there.

  5. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by nyoung View Post
    It seems that colour is not perceived the same by everyone.

    I recall reading - in a sociology text I think - about some Kodak research 40+ years ago in which they asked test subjects to choose the whitest white from a panel of whites ever so slightly tinted with different colours.

    Choice of "white" seemed to depend on the subjects cultural/ethnic/regional origin with Northern Europeans preferring blueish whites and folks from Southern Europe liking reddish or yellowish whites.
    The tests showed that context was important. For example, take that bluish white and put it on a "white" wedding gown and everyone objected. They preferred a pinkish or yellowish white depending on the rest of the surround. The details go on from there, but the tests show that everyone has a preference.

    PE

  6. #16

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    Another good example for me is the "ringaround" you see in colour processing books which you can use to identify colour casts. Some casts are easily spotted even when the cast is slight and others are very difficult. In one of my books it's a picture of a young blond girl with an ivory coloured cardigan. Because her hair and cardigan are such large parts of the picture the example of the slight yellow cast looks almost normal. In fact take away the genuinely neutral picture and most viewers woud identify the yellow cast as being the authentic neutral picture.

    Terence Donovan used to say that whatever you do, always err on the warm side. No clients ever complained when the cast was too warm but instantly rejected any that had the slightest of hint of a blue or cyan cast.

    pentaxuser

  7. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by pentaxuser View Post
    Terence Donovan used to say that whatever you do, always err on the warm side. No clients ever complained when the cast was too warm but instantly rejected any that had the slightest of hint of a blue or cyan cast.

    pentaxuser
    I've noticed that too. I've also noticed that I've printed images differently at different times, and that it depends upon the light you evaluate the print by.
    --Nicholas Andre

  8. #18
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    Ektar looks quite real and not unreal to me. I've seen it put to good use to beautiful indoor portraiture in controlled lighting, (unsuitable for uncontrolled/natural lighting though imho), I'd follow Kodak's recommendation for the film, Kodak know's better than 2F/2F what their film is good for imho.

    Calling it innaccurate in colour reproduction is like calling Reala or other C-41 films more colour accurate than E-6 films, when they cant even reproduce certain colours -at all- let alone accurately, while E-6 can.

  9. #19

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    OP, it might be worth looking at the Roger(Hicks) and Frances(Schultz) Photography site. There's a review of the film there which does seem to lend some credence to the belief held by some that Ektar is a little garish in certain conditions but it depends on your definition of garish.

    pentaxuser

  10. #20
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    If you want to evaluate if you like a film or if it's suitable for a particular purpose you can't rely on other people perceptions, different people have different colour vision, and prefer different colour pallets and levels of saturation I'm afraid the only way I.M.O. is "Suck it and see"
    Ben

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