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  1. #21

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    I don't think Ektar will work for you if you like Velvia a lot, I would give the Fuji Reala 100 a try.
    Ektar has the typical Kodak colours, that work good for me.

  2. #22
    rjbuzzclick's Avatar
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    [QUOTE=PhotoJim;973537]Agfa Ultra 50 was the closest, and it was interesting, but I never took to it like I took to Velvia.

    That was my favorite color film back in the 90's, I miss it dearly.
    Reid

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/rjbuzzclick/

    "If I had a nickel for every time I had to replace a camera battery, I'd be able to get the #@%&$ battery cover off!" -Me

  3. #23
    benjiboy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bastian Schramm View Post
    I don't think Ektar will work for you if you like Velvia a lot, I would give the Fuji Reala 100 a try.
    Ektar has the typical Kodak colours, that work good for me.
    I like Reala but Fuji have has recently announced they are discontinuing it in all formats., if you want strong in your face saturated colours like Velvia has, I suggest you try some of the consumer films.
    Ben

  4. #24

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    Quote Originally Posted by 2F/2F View Post
    Who are "they" (and where is "here")? Ridiculous! Ektar does not need to be sent anywhere special for processing! C-41 is C-41 is C-41. It is a standardized process, and any film that sez "process C-41" on the cassette can be run with the same processing method in which any other C-41 film can be run. There are no emulsion-specific process variations for still color negative films.
    "They" are Bic Camera and Yodobashi Camera, the two main electronics/camera/film stores in Japan (here). I know it's C-41, but they claim they "have to" send it to Kodak. I've heard stories of people with better japanese language skills than mine managing to convince the odd guy at the counter to process them together with the rest of their color negs, but it seems to be rare & difficult (pro labs like Horiuchi are apparently more easily convinced, but they're also more expensive than big stores).

    I doubt it has to do with the scans or prints as I never order either of these (I scan everything myself, their scanning service is expensive and relatively low-res). i wish I could develop myself, but it's not an option where I live currently. Maybe in the next apartment...

  5. #25

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    Ektar is a great film that gives the punchy color of slides. It isn't nearly as contrasty as Velvia. I heard that part of the perceived color saturation with slide film comes from the increased contrast. Supposedly Ektar renders colors just as saturated but more realistically because there is no need to pump the color with contrast.

    I shot a role in a Pentax 67 and could not believe how beautiful the color was. It leaves skin a bit magenta just like the Provia I loved to shoot. A good print film for color fanatics.

  6. #26
    Poisson Du Jour's Avatar
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    What!? You're "not good enough to shoot slide film."!? Bollocks. I'll bet you have a hidden talent for nailing "Vaudeville Velvia"!

    Velvia is designed for diffuse illumination; it will give just awful results in bright point light. Best to buy a roll or two and shoot at both 50ISO and 40. It requires experience and discipline to expose well (to the point of exhibition-quality images bound for printing). Don't try it with people as skin will come out quite ruddy. Velvia 100 has overly-enriched reds and a sensitive white curve (blows easily). 100F is a fun emulsion excellent for sunrise and sunset images with better shadow control, but not as enriched as Velvia 50. Give them all a whirl.
    .::Gary Rowan Higgins

    A comfort zone is a wonderful place. But nothing ever grows there.
    —Anon.






  7. #27
    accozzaglia's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Amaury View Post
    "They" are Bic Camera and Yodobashi Camera, the two main electronics/camera/film stores in Japan (here). I know it's C-41, but they claim they "have to" send it to Kodak. I've heard stories of people with better japanese language skills than mine managing to convince the odd guy at the counter to process them together with the rest of their color negs, but it seems to be rare & difficult (pro labs like Horiuchi are apparently more easily convinced, but they're also more expensive than big stores).

    I doubt it has to do with the scans or prints as I never order either of these (I scan everything myself, their scanning service is expensive and relatively low-res). i wish I could develop myself, but it's not an option where I live currently. Maybe in the next apartment...
    I'm not shocked by this. Any subroutine out of the ordinary can, I've found, throw staff for a loop. I'll never forget my visit to Tokyu Hands when I presented the writing pen specialist with one of my venerable Pilot BP-S ball-point pens that I've used for over 25 years. They are made in Japan by a Japanese company. The look on his face, though, was of abject confusion. Rather than just shaking his head indicating that they did not sell it, he looked at the pen, then at his display, puzzled, then around the display, then to another co-worker in the writing pads area, who also looked confused, and then he ambled back to me. It was as if I'd presented him with a steak knife or something completely of a different nature — like I had somehow short-circuited something. My travel partner, a former resident, explained the whole breaking-routine-causes-confusion response dilemma.

    In short, the suggestion I might offer is this: circle "C-41" on both a roll of Fujicolor and the roll of Ektar and make a point to note they are one in the same. It might not work, but being as literal as that is nevertheless worth a try.

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