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  1. #1

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    Restoring faded transparency

    A friend has some frames from motion pictures that have faded to magenta,
    would I be correct in thinking that this would be a C41 process film without mask layer? Is any restoration of the colour possible?

  2. #2
    DanielStone's Avatar
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    no, its most likely a an old roll of reversal(transparency) film stock, older films(other than kodachrome really) fade to magenta, sometimes yellow. generally they dark fade, some light fade however.

    you'll need to have it sc@nned and burned to a dvd so you can edit it on the computer in a dig!+@l program. make sure its in an editable format though, not just a standard "plays straight on your dvd player" format.

    -Dan

  3. #3
    Photo Engineer's Avatar
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    If it has a black border it is a reversal film. If it has a clear border it is probably a print film.

    Some of these old films can be restored by soaking in strong ferricyanide solution. I would test a small piece first before I tried this. I have done it and if it is the wrong type of film nothing bad happens. If it is the right kind, the cyans are restored.

    Here is the 75 deg F process:

    Soak in ferricyanide solution until restored, but not more than 10 minutes. (50 g/l Sodium or Potassium Ferricyanide)

    Wash for 10 minutes in running water.

    Stabilize in old style stabilizer with formalin. (Mix up Photo Flo 200 as directed and add 10 ml of 37% formalin).

    PE

  4. #4
    David A. Goldfarb's Avatar
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    That's incredible, Ron. I wouldn't have thought there was an analogue solution for this.

    So does bleaching work on print film or reversal? Does it work with negs (I'm thinking about that VPSII/220 you sent me a while back--still have a couple of rolls, and the negs have a definite magenta bias, though correctable in printing)?
    flickr--http://www.flickr.com/photos/davidagoldfarb/
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  5. #5
    Sirius Glass's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Photo Engineer View Post
    If it has a black border it is a reversal film. If it has a clear border it is probably a print film.

    Some of these old films can be restored by soaking in strong ferricyanide solution. I would test a small piece first before I tried this. I have done it and if it is the wrong type of film nothing bad happens. If it is the right kind, the cyans are restored.

    Here is the 75 deg F process:

    Soak in ferricyanide solution until restored, but not more than 10 minutes. (50 g/l Sodium or Potassium Ferricyanide)

    Wash for 10 minutes in running water.

    Stabilize in old style stabilizer with formalin. (Mix up Photo Flo 200 as directed and add 10 ml of 37% formalin).

    PE
    Even for color?
    Warning!! Handling a Hasselblad can be harmful to your financial well being!

    Nothing beats a great piece of glass!

    I leave the digital work for the urologists and proctologists.

  6. #6
    Photo Engineer's Avatar
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    David, it depends on the cyan dye. Sometimes, the cyan dye reverts to its colorless (leuco) form and can be reoxidized to the colored form. Unfortunately, some dyes separate into their two component parts and others decompose totally. Some films form the leuco dye for just a limited time or under some keeping conditions and this confounds the issue as they gradually fade away anyhow. I cannot say as I don't know which generation of films are involved.

    To answer your question though, any Kodak film might be regenerated by this method. It usually does no harm if the film is not regenerated, as long as you wash and stabilize afterwards.

    If anyone is really interested, I will ask around and get more information on the possible Kodak films that can be "fixed" this way. I think though that one of the Kodak guys who posts on PN referred to this not long ago.

    PE

  7. #7
    Photo Engineer's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sirius Glass View Post
    Even for color?
    The OP refers to color, as does all of my posts.

    PE

  8. #8
    David A. Goldfarb's Avatar
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    Thanks, Ron. I may do some tests. Of particular interest is some 11x14" EPR that I have that's circa 1992 and has been going magenta. Some of it in opened packages has faded around the edges, so I would consider that unusable, but some is still sealed, so if it's gone magenta in an uniform way and might be bleached back to normal, it would be worth running some tests, 11x14" color transparency film being a costly proposition.
    flickr--http://www.flickr.com/photos/davidagoldfarb/
    Photography (not as up to date as the flickr site)--http://www.davidagoldfarb.com/photo
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  9. #9
    Photo Engineer's Avatar
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    David;

    My suggestion only works with processed film.

    If it is raw unexposed film, then this does not work. Sorry.

    PE

  10. #10
    David A. Goldfarb's Avatar
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    My thought was to shoot and process it, try bleaching, and see what happens.
    flickr--http://www.flickr.com/photos/davidagoldfarb/
    Photography (not as up to date as the flickr site)--http://www.davidagoldfarb.com/photo
    Academic (Slavic and Comparative Literature)--http://www.davidagoldfarb.com

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