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  1. #91
    fotch's Avatar
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    pmu, they are probably talking about 35mm. Working solutions often have very short life. If they 6 hours, I would believe them.
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  2. #92
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    Quote Originally Posted by srs5694 View Post
    I can't help you with your main questions; however....



    It's still not quite 250 ml, but check out this 120-format developing tank. I've got a couple of these and they use 260 ml of solution (the figure is stamped on the lid, and you can sort of make it out in the auction's photo); however, they can't use inversion agitation, just rotational agitation via a rotating stick. I find this very difficult to get right, so negatives developed this way often have streaks. If you're used to this type of agitation and want to save a little money on chemicals, one of these tanks might be just the thing. I believe that Jobo-style rotary tanks could also do a roll of 120 in a similar amount of solution, but I don't know the exact figures offhand. I've seen posts from people who use Paterson-style tanks in this way (rolling them on a countertop) to save chemicals, but I've never tried that.
    Hey, I have one of those tanks although I never used it. I have used newer (than that one) tanks with rotation, such as the Ansco, and never had streaks.

    I would guess maybe you need to rotate a bit more vigorous and alternate directions. If that doesn't help, maybe its due to the low volume?
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  3. #93

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    As i have reported earlier in this thread, i have used 8 weeks old _working solution_ and it has even been stored in half full bottles at room temp. Mr. "kompressor" wrote in this thread that he has developed almost 40 120 films under a period of 12 weeks in the same 1L working solution (page 5 in this thread).

  4. #94
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    W T F.

    Usually 6 WEEKS is promised for working solutions, rather than 6 hours.

    I've, however, used working solutions as old as 2-3 months without any problems, and never heard of problems. Mixed developers are quite robust and the instructions about a few weeks are conservative to be on the safe side. Actually, color developers may even last more than a year quite well if stored properly...

    How would continuous (replenishing) labs do it at all if it didn't last but just hours? That would cause huge replenishment rates.

    As I stated earlier, I would never buy anything from this company. I can see more and more reasons arising for my decision.

  5. #95

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    I will soon order more of this devoloper.

  6. #96

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    Okay sorry to join in so late, I am a little fuzzy on the actual capacity of this developer and the kits available in the US. I am about to embark on a project that will involve shooting hundreds of sheets of C41 and my local lab has just quit processing C41. So my question is, what is the sheet capacity that I can expect to see coming out of the 20-Roll kit? Assuming I am using the 3010 Expert Drum with 10 4x5 sheets loaded am I only going to get 2 runs? 4? Maybe I missed the class in school where they taught 120 roll - sheet film area equivalences but if you can fill me in i'd greatly appreciate it.

    -a

  7. #97

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    @dbla: One 4x5" sheet is 129 square cm. 120 film is around 80cm long, that is 6x80=480. So if the developer has a capacity of 20 rolls (20x480=9600) it would mean that you can develop over 70 sheets.

  8. #98
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    Ok, someone help me figure out something. I have a phototherm rotary processor, and it is designed to do one shot processing. I can easily get two rolls of 120 or two rolls of 35mm in 250ml, but that seems like a real waste of the chemical capacity of the kit.

    Is it possible to dilute? It seems to me that diluted developer will wreck the diffusion rates into the gelatin substrate.
    Michael Batchelor
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  9. #99
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    Quote Originally Posted by michaelbsc View Post
    Ok, someone help me figure out something. I have a phototherm rotary processor, and it is designed to do one shot processing. I can easily get two rolls of 120 or two rolls of 35mm in 250ml, but that seems like a real waste of the chemical capacity of the kit.

    Is it possible to dilute? It seems to me that diluted developer will wreck the diffusion rates into the gelatin substrate.
    Is there no way to recollect the chemicals after development?

  10. #100
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    Collecting fixer is easy since the machine is designed to do that. The other chemicals dump to the waste port, making it harder to do. It may be easier to process by hand than trying to manipulate a hose on the drain.



    Dilution rather than recovery is the answer for making it easy. But I think that's probably unworkable.



    The machine's design criteria were for small volume but pro lab quality results. One shot use ensures the chems are always fresh. But in this case it works against the hobbyists.
    Last edited by michaelbsc; 08-27-2010 at 08:30 AM. Click to view previous post history.
    Michael Batchelor
    Industrial Informatics, Inc.
    www.industrialinformatics.com

    The camera catches light. The photographer catches life.



 

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