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  1. #1
    socaljc's Avatar
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    how to fly with 4x5" Velvia sheet films?

    I did find some info on TSA website: http://www.tsa.gov/travelers/airtrav...rial_1035.shtm

    I am flying to Maine this fall for some photography trip and just wondering how do you guys protect your 4x5 sheet films from being scanned by X-ray machines? I use Velvia 50 and 100 sheet films mainly.

    Many thanks!

  2. #2
    Kevin Caulfield's Avatar
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    Definitely don't put it in your checked baggage or it will be fried. It's probably best just to leave it in your carry-on baggage for scanning rather than risk ignorant security people trying to open it if you request a hand search. Being ISO 50 and 100 it will be fine, even for several scans.

  3. #3

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    I wouldn't worry about sending it through the carry-on baggage scanner. I ran a bunch of the considerably faster Tri-X and Plus-X through one on my last trip to CA twice with no problems. If you're really worried about it, just send the film ahead via UPS or Fedex. It'll cost you a few dollars, but you'll have peace of mind.
    Frank Schifano

  4. #4
    David A. Goldfarb's Avatar
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    Put it through the carryon X-ray scanner and don't worry about it. Velvia isn't fast enough to be fogged by X-ray, even if there are multiple exposures. I'd be more concerned about the possibility of the inspector opening the box.
    flickr--http://www.flickr.com/photos/davidagoldfarb/
    Photography (not as up to date as the flickr site)--http://www.davidagoldfarb.com/photo
    Academic (Slavic and Comparative Literature)--http://www.davidagoldfarb.com

  5. #5
    Athiril's Avatar
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    I thought this was going to be about aerial photography

  6. #6
    MikeSeb's Avatar
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    Ditto David. Happened to a friend of a friend. Increasingly, I'll be shipping film ahead, and then back home after exposure, when it's most vulnerable to fogging by x-rays.
    Michael Sebastian
    Website | Blog

  7. #7
    socaljc's Avatar
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    Thanks!
    I will probably ship some along with hand-carrying some.

  8. #8
    Ian David's Avatar
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    Despite the constant chewing of fingernails over this question, I don't think I have ever heard of any modern photographer suffering damage to film from the X-ray machines that scan hand baggage (certainly not re ISO400 and below). You are much more likely to lose your film in the post when you try to send it to yourself than you are to have it damaged by the X-ray machines. Put it in your hand baggage and forget about it.

  9. #9

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    Trip to DC and back yielded no fog on iso400, 160, or 100. Should be fine in carry-on baggage. If there is some doubt, ask for a hand check and watch the guy like a hawk. One tried to open a factory sealed box of film, it was a matter of explaining what it was and why he couldnt open it.

    All the best, hope you get some good ones from Maine.
    M. David Farrell, Jr.

    ----------------------------------------------
    ~Buying a Nikon doesn not make you a photographer. It makes you a Nikon owner!

    ~Everybody has a photographic memory, but not everybody has film!

  10. #10

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    I am a pilot and fly for a living--so for fun I put a roll of 400NC in my bag and let it sit for a couple months. That roll probably went through carry on scans 20-30 times --not a single problem. I regularly carry film on my trips and have never had an issue with carry on baggage Don't worry! Pack it well and if you get subjected to additional scanning just let the TSA agent know there is light sensitive film in the box). If they insist on opening it ask for a supervisior and have it swabbed. If they still insist on opening your film and wrecking the whole box--such is life (granted this case will be so remote it is about as likely as you loosing your film on your trip--even less so). Side note--the only thing that has drawn addition from screeners and questions was the curled up shutter release cable that happened to appear connected to something electronic in the x-ray image. After seeing how it looked on the screen, I would have stopped me too had I been asked to make the call. Have a great trip and pack your shutter release cable in the checked bag

    Matt

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