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  1. #11
    brucemuir's Avatar
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    how can you tell when the blix is spent?

    do you prints fade when exposed to white light/washing?

  2. #12
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    Regarding citric acid, it is very polar compared to acetic acid. In a color process it is essential to get acid into the coupler solvent drops to neutralize the color developer and extract it. Citric acid, I have been told, is less efficient at this due to polarity. I have never tested it so IDK. The result would be a pinkish stain and lower image stability.

    A spent blix would cause darker, contaminated colors and a gradual browning or yellowing of the print. The result is similar to using spent fix on B&W prints.

    PE

  3. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by Photo Engineer View Post
    A spent blix would cause darker, contaminated colors and a gradual browning or yellowing of the print. The result is similar to using spent fix on B&W prints.

    PE
    Okay, so what causes a bluing, similar to a sheet that is just exposed to light just lighter?
    Mark Barendt, Beaverton, OR

    "We do not see things the way they are. We see things the way we are." Anaïs Nin

  4. #14
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    A spent blix retains silver metal as well and the silver metal combined with dye can cause a blue cast as well as dingy dark colors in general. It depends on the amount of retained silver.

    OTOH, insufficient development can also cause a blue cast as can improper optical brightner.

    PE

  5. #15
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    Thanks PE

    I found part of my issue tonight, I have been inadvertently bumping my hot plate thermostat.

    Tonight I started getting a brownish cast on the third sheet, checked the temp and I was up from 90 to 100.

    I shortened my develop and blix times from 1:10 to 90 sec and the problem was gone. Ran at 100 the rest of the evening sweet as pie.
    Mark Barendt, Beaverton, OR

    "We do not see things the way they are. We see things the way we are." Anaïs Nin

  6. #16
    Photo Engineer's Avatar
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    Well, you said brownish cast.

    That comes from overdevelopment or from iron hydroxides precipitating from bad bleach. You had the former problem then.

    PE

  7. #17
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    So PE,

    If "the blue" were covering the whole paper, most visible in the margins; that would be the spent blix, correct?

    If the blue cast was just in the exposed area would that indicate the developer?
    Mark Barendt, Beaverton, OR

    "We do not see things the way they are. We see things the way we are." Anaïs Nin

  8. #18
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    Spent blix, underdevelopment or too much optical brightener. This would probably apply to all areas.

    PE

  9. #19

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    Separate Bleach&Fix?

    I'm using a two part blix. Part 1 contains the bleach (Sodium Ferric EDTA) and part 2 the fixer (Ammonium Thiosulfate). Is is possible to use the two parts separately as bleach and fix instead of mixing it?

  10. #20
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    Yes, you can separate the two at a considerable penalty in rate of bleaching. It will take about 2x the normal blix rate for the bleach step, and the normal blix time for the fix step. To keep contamination down, you will need a wash step in between. If you don't wash, the fix will gradually become a weak blix all by itself due to carryover.

    PE

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