Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 70,333   Posts: 1,537,415   Online: 1161
      
Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 11 to 20 of 20
  1. #11
    lxdude's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    Redlands, So. Calif.
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    6,630
    As I understand it, one reason for the edge sharpness of Kodachrome is that the layers are significantly thinner than other emulsions. So, the edge transitions are literally sharper.

  2. #12

    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    8
    I was thinking of trying Sensia 100 @ ISO 125. Might make it more bluish to counter the ugly yellowish/brownish look, also increase contrast. Hopefully there's no loss in sharpness by doing this!!! But there could be...

    Then Velvia 100 or F at 80 or 64. I read Velvia F is less warm and doesn't look as nice as Velvia 100. In this case I hope the slides won't come out too overexposed. Most Velvia shooters are nature shooters who want the crazy saturation, so I haven't found any examples of how it could look at ISO 64 or 80. People used to shoot aircraft with old Velvia rated at 40 or even 32. Might have to waste a roll & development costs just to see if this works for Velvia 100.

    400X would definitely save the day in awful weather or if it's bright and a huge cloud parks itself to block the sun on the subject. Shots like that are ruined on slower films.

    ps: yes I've noticed that 'carving' on the other side of K slides, didn't know if that was unique to them.

  3. #13

    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    8
    Btw, interesting to note how the Fuji site pushes Sensia 100 as being sharper than Provia 100F yet their corresponding data sheets say otherwise:

    Sensia 100
    Chart Contrast 1.6 : 1 ............ 55 lines/mm
    Chart Contrast 1000 : 1 .......... 135 lines/mm

    Provia 100F
    Chart Contrast 1.6 : 1 ................... 60 lines/mm
    Chart Contrast 1000 : 1 ................. 140 lines/mm

    Velvia is even higher 80 and 160 lines/mm

  4. #14

    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    Sydney, Australia
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    328
    Images
    7
    I am really beginning to love Provia 100F. It is a great film and will be my main film for use once i run out of Kodachrome. E100VS is another one i love.

    My advice would be to shoot any of these films at ASA 125 (120 on my Gossen Digipro F)
    This brings out the colour just that little bit more.

    Read Galen Rowell's book "Mountain Light" if you want to read about rating film differently. This got me into shooting films 1/3 of a stop underexposed. It is generally always better. I prefer Velvia (50) rated at box speed though as it tends to have higher contrast and the shadows go black a bit easier.

    I always shoot Kodachrome 64 at 80 and my freshest K25 at 32. The colour is just that little bit richer and the feel is more true to the look that Kodachrome should have.

    Test a couple of rolls, setting the meter at 1/3 stop intervals and write this down, do a tally of what works best in which conditions and then use that as your guide.

  5. #15

    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Ventura, California
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    421
    Images
    1
    Andrew is correct, and I feel stupid now. That's what I meant to suggest, under-exposing by a little, so rate the Velvia 100 @ 125 or so. In my post above I said "80" which would be the WRONG way! Doh!

  6. #16

    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    Near Tavistock, Devon, on the edge of Dartmoor.
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    1,024
    I like the colour rendition of Sensia 100 and I have to say that I've never been aware of the yellow/brownish appearance that has been mentioned. As ever with anything you don't process yourself, you're in the hands of others and I wonder whether the processing could be the cause of this. I'm in the UK and buy my Sensia process-paid, so it goes to the designated FujiFilm lab in Leeds, which (one would hope) would be the best place for it!
    Best wishes,
    Steve

  7. #17

    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    85
    Kodak Elitechrome 100, smidge warmer than E100G (probably like the old E100GX), 35mm only mind but a really fantastic slide film.

    There is also Elitechrome 100 Extra Colour but that's more like E100VS, great film but not like Kodachrome.

    There is also Elitechrome 200. I love Elitechrome, great stuff.


  8. #18

    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    11
    The scans of Provia 100F provided by the OP hardly does the film justice. K25 is sharper than Provia 100F, but Provia 100F is hardly not sharp!

    Three pictures to back up my claims:
    #1
    #2
    #3

    More images here.

  9. #19

    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    11
    Lilserenity, that is simply a wonderful capture. I've always looked down upon Elitechrome, perhaps I should give the film a revisit. How are you finding it with people and portraits?

    Quote Originally Posted by lilserenity View Post
    Kodak Elitechrome 100, smidge warmer than E100G (probably like the old E100GX), 35mm only mind but a really fantastic slide film.

    There is also Elitechrome 100 Extra Colour but that's more like E100VS, great film but not like Kodachrome.

    There is also Elitechrome 200. I love Elitechrome, great stuff.


  10. #20

    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    11
    In the interest of fair play, here is a Kodachrome 25 image. Not as sharp as some provided by the OP, but I was working under less-than-ideal conditions.

Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin