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  1. #1
    stephanie's Avatar
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    film in a bath tub

    i just had a friend ask me if i had ever put my film in a tub to get an aging effect

    has anyone ever herd of this

    and is there any other suggestions for aging film

  2. #2
    holmburgers's Avatar
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    Unless the tub is full of some sort of liquid, nothing will happen..... ok, just kidding. But I think it's unclear what you mean.

  3. #3

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    You want to age film in what way exactly?

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    stephanie's Avatar
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    in a bath tub full of water lol

    and i think were are going for a 60's color shift

  5. #5

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    I've heard of burning, scratching, sanding, toning, bleaching, and I'm not sure what else.
    Nothing specific to bathtubs though.

    and i think were are going for a 60's color shift
    Ektachrome (and lots of others) from the '60's will do that all by itself, no tub needed

  6. #6
    holmburgers's Avatar
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    I don't know what water would do to film before processing. I think it might damage it a bit too much, like make it unusable. For color shifts, try heating it. Maybe put it in a 200 degree oven for an hour or something. I'd be very curious to see the result.

  7. #7
    stephanie's Avatar
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    same here i told her what about expired film
    because expired paper sometimes has a yellow shift 60's looking shift

  8. #8
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    (to holmburgers )
    and that would not melt it ? at all

  9. #9
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    How about soaking in very warm(not hot) water to remove the AH coating prior to use. Might be able to do this with 35mm film in the cassette without removing the film first. May need several rinses to clear all the dye, then hope it doesnt stick together.
    Rick Allen
    Argentum aevum

  10. #10
    Kevin Kehler's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by holmburgers View Post
    I don't know what water would do to film before processing. I think it might damage it a bit too much, like make it unusable. For color shifts, try heating it. Maybe put it in a 200 degree oven for an hour or something. I'd be very curious to see the result.
    I left a Holga loaded with Ektar 100 in a car at +30 C degrees for 2 days; all the shrubs and greenery went blue/purple and my daughters skin looks like a boiled lobster. Not intentional but some interesting looks.
    Once a photographer is convinced that the camera can lie and that, strictly speaking, the vast majority of photographs are "camera lies," inasmuch as they tell only part of a story or tell it in a distorted form, half the battle is won. Once he has conceded that photography is not a "naturalistic" medium of rendition and that striving for "naturalism" in a photograph is futile, he can turn his attention to using a camera to make more effective pictures.

    Andreas Feininger

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