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  1. #11
    Ian Grant's Avatar
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    Fuji Superia is superb film, I tend to use the 200 rather than the 400 and it enlarges superbly, and is extremely sharp/fine grained.

    Ian

  2. #12

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    I think the 200 and 800 are the nicest of the Superia films. Superia Reala is even better!
    Steve.

  3. #13
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    As for buying film in general. It's really no fun to choose one and stick with it.... EXPERIMENT!

    If you start looking on eBay, local craigslist, and here on APUG, you can get quite a respectable stock of perhaps slightly outdated (but frozen/fridged) film and professional stock at that, usually cheaper than new consumer stock.

    It's fun to see the differences and eventually you'll find something that you like.

    Just my 2 cents.

  4. #14

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    Thanks for all the help!

    I'm a bit curious as to how the resolution works for film. From what I think I know, the resolution solely depends on the film and digital scaner. (is that correct?) So, if I decide I need to shoot with the superia, what is the max resolution I can scan without it getting blurry (assuming the film scanner is pretty good)? I was hoping that the quality of the shots would be comparable with a dslr. Would that be possible with the regular superia, or would I have to buy more pro films?

    Is there any difference in terms of resolution from the regular superia and the superia press?

    Again, thanks for the help!

    -Jeff

  5. #15

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    Quote Originally Posted by staphkills View Post
    Thanks for all the help!

    I'm a bit curious as to how the resolution works for film. From what I think I know, the resolution solely depends on the film and digital scaner. (is that correct?) So, if I decide I need to shoot with the superia, what is the max resolution I can scan without it getting blurry (assuming the film scanner is pretty good)? I was hoping that the quality of the shots would be comparable with a dslr. Would that be possible with the regular superia, or would I have to buy more pro films?

    Is there any difference in terms of resolution from the regular superia and the superia press?

    Again, thanks for the help!

    -Jeff
    It's not a straight forward comparison. Film resolution peters out gradually, where as a cmos/ccd chip has however many pixels it has and that's it. It's also a question of colour etc.

    You really need to try it and find out whether or not it works for your purposes. If you are looking at scanned images at 25%-30% on screen gives you a reasonable aproximation of what a digital print will look like. This doesn't really predict what wet prints will look like in my experience.

    If you really care about resolution you'll save yourself a lot of trouble by shooting medium format, but If you want a colour negative film that easily out resolves the best in digital try ektar 100.


    The difference between the regular superia and the "press" superia is that the latter is cold stored for more consistent colour roll to roll. No difference in resolution as far as I know.

  6. #16

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    Thanks for the response jpberger.

    I guess what I mean by resolution size is that I want a film to be able to produce something more than postcard sized photos...I'm hoping that the superia 400 will allow me to enlarge some photos afterward (maybe to the dimensions of a printer paper or a small poster). Would that be possible?

    Is there any photos online of a photo shot with fuiji superia 400 scanned with a higher resolution film scanner? I'm hoping to get a idea of how my photos will look like after I scan the photos. I've tried to look on this forum, but I think I need to become a member to view the full size photos.

    Thanks for helping me out!

    -Jeff

  7. #17

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    8x10 is no problem. 11x14 if it's tripod sharp. I've done llx14 on fuji supergloss from 35mm superia 200 and it looks really good. But that is for my kind of photography to my standards-- your milage may, likely will, vary. You'd best inquire with the good folks at hybridphoto,com for all the scanner stuff. As I said before, you really have to try it yourself-- to many variables for anyone else to say what's going to work for your purposes.

  8. #18
    2F/2F's Avatar
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    I go up to 8x12 (and 6x9) with the Superia 800 routinely. I think it looks fine, but then again, I don't shoot it expecting it to be grainless. I am, however, always surprised at how well it holds up in an 8x enlargement. Pro 800Z will look much less grainy in the same size print, but the added smoothness also affects the sharpness to my eyes. It also has a very different rendering of color and contrast. It has a softer, subdued, painterly, almost "dream-or-fantasy-like" look, while the Superia 800 is more journalistic: gritty, and very realistic in terms of contrast and color.

    The great thing about Pro 800Z, at least to my eye, was that it was (no longer made, though still readily available) one of the few color films ever made that offered a combination of high-ish contrast and subdued/natural saturation. As I mentioned, this uniqueness combined with its soft grain make for an incredibly painterly image; especially once you start stretching the enlargements. It is one of my favorite films for "gentle" rendering of both landscapes and people. Superia 800 is the opposite to me: Crisp, gritty, and very plain ("straightforward," perhaps). I use the Superia 800 more than the Pro 800Z, just because of what I tend to shoot, but I still think that the Pro 800Z is one of the very most amazing films ever made, from an artistic standpoint and a technical one.

    Superia Reala enlarges to 8x12 without any visible grain at all. Just a little loss of sharpness if you stick your nose into the print, which goes away when you back up to a sensible viewing distance.

    Prints from Superia Reala in 120 format are a real thing of beauty. Boy, do I wish this film was made in sheet sizes.....
    2F/2F

    "Truth and love are my law and worship. Form and conscience are my manifestation and guide. Nature and peace are my shelter and companions. Order is my attitude. Beauty and perfection are my attack."

    - Rob Tyner (1944 - 1991)

  9. #19
    PhotoJim's Avatar
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    Superia's good stuff and it's cheap. If you want to make the monster prints, though, Ektar 100 is what you want. It's probably the finest-grained film ever made.
    Jim MacKenzie - Regina, Saskatchewan, Canada

    A bunch of Nikons; Feds, Zorkis and a Kiev; Pentax 67-II (inherited from my deceased father-in-law); Bronica SQ-A; and a nice Shen Hao 4x5 field camera with 3 decent lenses that needs to be taken outside more. Oh, and as of mid-2012, one of those bodies we don't talk about here.

    Favourite film: do I need to pick only one?

  10. #20

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    Quote Originally Posted by staphkills View Post
    I guess what I mean by resolution size is that I want a film to be able to produce something more than postcard sized photos...I'm hoping that the superia 400 will allow me to enlarge some photos afterward (maybe to the dimensions of a printer paper or a small poster). Would that be possible?
    The problem with your question is that the answer is always "yes." It's possible to enlarge a 35mm negative, from any type of film, to the size of a billboard, or to project it against a skyscraper, for that matter. Whether you'd like the result is another question, and the answer to that is highly subjective.

    Is there any photos online of a photo shot with fuiji superia 400 scanned with a higher resolution film scanner? I'm hoping to get a idea of how my photos will look like after I scan the photos.
    I've shot a fair amount of Superia in various speeds, and I've got a Minolta DiMAGE Scan Elite 5400 dpi scanner. I'd be happy to e-mail you a small number of 5400 dpi scans from Fuji Superia at various ISOs. (I normally scan at 2700 dpi, since higher resolutions are only useful when making pretty big enlargements.) Send me a PM with your e-mail address if you're interested. The scans are about 8-15MB apiece, in JPEG form.

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