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  1. #11
    Ian Grant's Avatar
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    There's another thread about this just a few days ago and Simon Galley (Ilford) said that freezing or even refrigeration isn't really necessary with B&W films.

    Yes it will extend the life, but most of us use it well before freezing would be beneficial, Colour pro films are different, they need refrigeration.

    Ian

  2. #12
    alexmacphee's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ian Grant View Post
    Yes it will extend the life, but most of us use it well before freezing would be beneficial
    What sort of shelf life and extension beyond expiry can be expected from freezing over cool storage?
    Alex

  3. #13
    Poisson Du Jour's Avatar
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    As I see it, deep-frozen film is in "suspended animation", if you like: it is not ageing at a normal rate, but at a greatly retarded rate, even beyond it's nominal expiry. All film will succumb to deterioration over a long period of time from environmental factors beyond our control (e.g. radiation). I am not concerned for deep-frozen film that expired xx number of years ago if it has been stored carefully.
    “The photographer must determine how he wants the finished print to look before he exposes the negative.
    Before releasing the shutter, he must seek 'the flame of recognition,' a sense that the picture would reveal
    the greater mystery of things...more clearly than the eyes see."
    ~Edward Weston, 1922.

  4. #14
    Ian Grant's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by alexmacphee View Post
    What sort of shelf life and extension beyond expiry can be expected from freezing over cool storage?
    Difficult to say, possible 10-15 years and longer, that doesn't mean there aren't slight changes in the emulsions though.

    Taking the other extreme my HP5 which I bought short dated 3 years it expired Jan 08 ago is still perfectly OK despite storage at 28-30° C at times in the summer here in Turkey, the coolest place in the apartment is a bottom drawer.

    I agree with BradS in the other thread that sometimes people are overly cautious..

    Maybe if your favourite emulsion is being discontinued there's a case of stock piling, if you have sufficient spare cash, but it's not for me.

    Ian

  5. #15
    alexmacphee's Avatar
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    I kept some Orwo Pan in the freezer, with an expiry date of 2005, and so far it's worked perfectly. I think I'll start to move the B&W stock from the freezer to the fridge, since around three quarters of my stock is colour, and I'm getting domestic complaints that there's no more room for food in the freezer. Besides, I've just had another delivery of Agfa APX, and that really is for stockpiling.
    Alex

  6. #16
    stevco's Avatar
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    I don't want to open new topic, because there are similar already, so:

    I have around 8 rolls Portra 160vc and 3 rolls T-max 400, all expired 2005-2006. I think that I will use them all through the summer, maybe most of the colors film in the end of August.
    I store them in a closet, in a guest room on 2nd floor on the house (so no-one lives there), the room is dry and it's pretty dark for the most part of the day.
    I'm little afraid that on the 2nd floor the temperature are higher than on the ground-rooms which have more condensation on the walls, a thing that might affect the films maybe more negatively than the temperature?

    Is this safe place?

    Or should I freeze them.
    "It's not about the pictures, concepts, people, human bodies, emotions, experimentations, colours, dreams, tricky scenes, camera or imaginations.. it's about the poetry behind them all."

  7. #17
    Ian Grant's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by stevco View Post
    I don't want to open new topic, because there are similar already, so:

    I have around 8 rolls Portra 160vc and 3 rolls T-max 400, all expired 2005-2006. I think that I will use them all through the summer, maybe most of the colors film in the end of August.
    I store them in a closet, in a guest room on 2nd floor on the house (so no-one lives there), the room is dry and it's pretty dark for the most part of the day.
    I'm little afraid that on the 2nd floor the temperature are higher than on the ground-rooms which have more condensation on the walls, a thing that might affect the films maybe more negatively than the temperature?

    Is this safe place?

    Or should I freeze them.
    Not really for the colour films.

    We are luck it's a ground floor apartment so the bottom drawer is the coolest place in the whole block.

    If your films are still in the sealed wrappers etc then downstairs should be OK, they are protected against humidity.

    Ian

  8. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by staphkills View Post
    Hi all,

    Thanks for the replies! What should I do if the factory seal is opened? (I'm not sure if the film I'm getting will be factory sealed).

    Put it in a ZipLoc bag at room temperture forcing out as much air as you can. Toss it is the freeze. When you want to use it, allow it to get to room temperture before opening.

    Steve
    Warning!! Handling a Hasselblad can be harmful to your financial well being!

    Nothing beats a great piece of glass!

    I leave the digital work for the urologists and proctologists.

  9. #19

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    I believe that for long term storage Kodak suggests keeping all films at -5 C to -10 C. They say that this temperature represents the best compromise between quality and electricity cost.

    Other factors also determine how well a fim ages such as background radiation and cosmic rays. Both of these are however out of our control.
    A rock pile ceases to be a rock pile the moment a single man contemplates it, bearing within him the image of a cathedral.

    ~Antoine de Saint-Exupery

  10. #20
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    Keep it Cold so it don't get Old. Store in zip locks in smaller quantities so you don't have the bring a large amount back to room temperature.
    Items for sale or trade at www.Camera35.com

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