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  1. #11
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    It's hard to recommend if you do not reveal your location.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Domin View Post
    It's hard to recommend if you do not reveal your location.
    NYC. I see kitchen scales locally that claim .1g resolution for about $30 Are these accurate?

  3. #13
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    Some people use sulphite by pinches while printing B&W. Unless you are into accuracy and consistency you might be happy with pinches.

    If you worry about accuracy you can make a solution from larger quantity of sulphite and measure volume rather then weight. A syringe might be of help.

  4. #14

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    Quote Originally Posted by Domin View Post
    Some people use sulphite by pinches while printing B&W. Unless you are into accuracy and consistency you might be happy with pinches.

    If you worry about accuracy you can make a solution from larger quantity of sulphite and measure volume rather then weight. A syringe might be of help.
    PE's recommended quantities are rather small, so I would think that accuracy would be required to avoiding killing off the dmax.

    Can anyone who has tried this tell me how dramatic the effect is?

  5. #15
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    Over the range of 0.5 - 2 g / L the effect on paper is very dramatic. You go from a near normal print to one with very washed out colors and low contrast. Dmax of all dyes is reduced and cyan dye is much less. So, I suggest accuracy and caution!

    This is a competer for dye formation (discussed on the Kodachrome retirement thread ). It decreases the amount of dye formed by competing for coupler with oxidized color developer.

    Be cautious with it.

    PE

  6. #16

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    Quote Originally Posted by Photo Engineer View Post
    Over the range of 0.5 - 2 g / L the effect on paper is very dramatic. You go from a near normal print to one with very washed out colors and low contrast. Dmax of all dyes is reduced and cyan dye is much less. So, I suggest accuracy and caution!

    This is a competer for dye formation (discussed on the Kodachrome retirement thread ). It decreases the amount of dye formed by competing for coupler with oxidized color developer.

    Be cautious with it.

    PE
    I will, and it sounds like fun! To be safe, I'll try it just in the printing stage for now. Thanks for all of your help on this.

  7. #17
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    IME, you can develop at 3:00 (as opposed to the normal 3:15 time) in C-41 and get completely acceptably-accurate color reproduction, and you can go down to about 2:45 or 2:50 and get color that is a little wonky, but that may be acceptable when less-than-critical color is not a drawback to the pix in question.

    You can also use a SLIMT technique, though I have never tried it personally. This sounds like the ticket to me, in theory, though all the examples I have seen - admittedly not many - have not done the theory justice IMO. This is a pre-development latent image bleaching bath that works mostly on the most exposed areas of the emulsion. It is supposedly similar to pulling b/w film by reducing development, but it does not have the drawback of losing a notable amount of density in the mildly exposed areas. A highly dilute potassium ferricyanide bath is used, and testing must be done to determine the best solution and time for the bleach bath.

    The SLIMT thingy can be used on b/w film, color negative film, and both color and b/w paper. It is certainly something that I must try for color work. I am not sure I would find it as useful for b/w, but for color, with the skimpy selection of papers available, and the limits on variation of the proper processes, it would be invaluable.
    2F/2F

    "Truth and love are my law and worship. Form and conscience are my manifestation and guide. Nature and peace are my shelter and companions. Order is my attitude. Beauty and perfection are my attack."

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  8. #18

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    Quote Originally Posted by 2F/2F View Post
    IME, you can develop at 3:00 (as opposed to the normal 3:15 time) in C-41 and get completely acceptably-accurate color reproduction, and you can go down to about 2:45 or 2:50 and get color that is a little wonky, but that may be acceptable when less-than-critical color is not a drawback to the pix in question.

    You can also use a SLIMT technique, though I have never tried it personally. This sounds like the ticket to me, in theory, though all the examples I have seen - admittedly not many - have not done the theory justice IMO. This is a pre-development latent image bleaching bath that works mostly on the most exposed areas of the emulsion. It is supposedly similar to pulling b/w film by reducing development, but it does not have the drawback of losing a notable amount of density in the mildly exposed areas. A highly dilute potassium ferricyanide bath is used, and testing must be done to determine the best solution and time for the bleach bath.

    The SLIMT thingy can be used on b/w film, color negative film, and both color and b/w paper. It is certainly something that I must try for color work. I am not sure I would find it as useful for b/w, but for color, with the skimpy selection of papers available, and the limits on variation of the proper processes, it would be invaluable.
    Can you point me to some examples?

  9. #19

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    One last question: I want to do tray development for the RA-4/sulfite experimentation, rather than filling up the Nova. I can easily heat up one tray. Is it ok to have the developer at full temperature, but the blix at room temp? I'm using Fuji paper and Kodak chems. Is the temperature problem that prevents compatibility at room temp specific to both chems, or just the developer?

  10. #20
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    If you run at 38 deg C in the developer, you may reticulate the paper or cause other problems if the blix is below about 30 deg C or thereabouts. I run at 20 deg C throughout or 38 deg C throughout, so I cannot give you exact figures. Sorry.

    PE

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