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  1. #21

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    "If you follow the directions consistently C-41 is incredibly consistent and reliable and easy and more tolerant than most people imagine."

    Exactly! Say, howz old Senator Nighthorse-Campbell doing there in Ignacio? (Ex-Colorado citizen, here.)

    "The dry powder kits are not exactly the same chemistry as the liquid kits due to the difficulty in packing Formalin, Photo Flo and Ammonium Hypo as solids. Therefore, they either omit them or use substitutes. This changes the action of the dry powder kits when mixed. Close, but no cigar!"

    I can't speak to Formalin, but Photo-Flo dries to a powder, albeit not much. I'm sure there are other solid wetting agents. And you should know that Ammonium Hypo is definitely to be had as a solid, I have some. True, not stable, and hard to find, but it exists. Or, as you say, substitutes.

  2. #22

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    Ammonium Thiosulfate indeed......

    Here's the MSDS for the Unicolor kit:

    http://freestylephoto.biz/pdf/Unicol...C-41%20Kit.pdf

  3. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by Paul Verizzo View Post
    Say, howz old Senator Nighthorse-Campbell doing there in Ignacio? (Ex-Colorado citizen, here.)
    Haven't heard of or about him lately.

    How's FL compared to Ignacio? We're considering a move south or west in a couple years.
    Mark Barendt, Ignacio, CO

    "We do not see things the way they are. We see things the way we are." Anaïs Nin

  4. #24
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    Paul;

    Have you ever tried to keep powdered Ammonium Hypo? In Florida? Not an easy task. Also, the blix contains Sodium Ferric EDTA which decreases capacity and activity by a huge amount.

    As for the Hexamine stabilzer, well, there is no surfactant and the presence of the Ammonia formed (if it does indeed decompose into formalin and ammonia, which is not assured) would not be good for the dyes.

    So, the blix contains solid Ammonium Hypo which will absorb water from the air and also oxidize more rapidly as a solid. It contains Sodium Ferric EDTA making it low in capacity and slower in action, and the stabilizer is better off used with the dioxane as a heating pellet rather than as a stabilizer IMHO. I worked on this type of stabilizer for a few years, as well as on film blixes remember!

    PE

  5. #25

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    All true, I'm sure, but..........it works. And has for decades. I'm an empiricist. The bumblebee that can't fly does. (Although I recently read that those old theories were wrong even in theory, let alone reality.)

    "Perfection is the enemy of good enough."

  6. #26
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    Paul;

    I'm sure it works, but I suggest you look for the following:

    1. Premature dye fade, especially in older negative films made before ~2002.
    2. Mold or fungus growth on negatives.
    3. High grain, reduced color saturation and high contrast compared to commercially processed negatives.

    #3 is the biggest immediate problem, as that Blix will have trouble removing all of the Silver metal in all films. BTDT! I ran Silver analyses on films processed in Blixes like that. Even a few milligrams of Silver per square foot causes image degradation.

    Back in the 60s, we could not get NH4FeEDTA, only the Sodium salt. We found that the more the Ammonia content, the higher the rate of Bleaching, but only one Blix really worked. One group learned how to make NH4FeEDTA and patented it (Stephen and Surash at EK USP 3615508) and another learned how to make a true film Blix (Mowrey, Stephen and Wolfarth of EK). You may wish to look at Example #1 in the patent by Stephen and Surash. The blix outside the invention is essentially the powder kit we are talking about. The sodium salt based blix is about 3x slower with the test film. This is what you will find!

    Good luck.

    PE

  7. #27

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    PE, I just want to first acknowledge my appreciation for the necessity of precision, perfectionist work in engineering. Especially for things like airplanes!

    But I still say that "good enough" is a perfectly fine parameter for many endeavors. Other than airplanes.

  8. #28
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    Paul;

    If there was no perfection in engineering any photo product, you would not enjoy photography very much. Engineering perfection is needed in all fields of work, or you get bad results. OTOH, if it works (makes you happy), use it. I have done too many analyses of off brand products to either give blanket condemnation or blanket approval. I therefore urge caution!

    PE

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