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  1. #21
    AgX
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ian Grant View Post
    Most people with motor drives don't use films like this anyway, they buy film designed for camera use by the major manufacturers.

    Ian
    This film is made by one major manufacturer, Agfa, and they offer PET-based films in 70mm DP (typeII), as well as in type 135.

    Not long ago Kodak offered at least two PET-based films in type 135 too.
    (Among them the Technical Pan.)




    (By the way: my excuses for mixing up Dwaynes with DR5.)
    Last edited by AgX; 10-08-2010 at 04:30 PM. Click to view previous post history.

  2. #22

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    Quote Originally Posted by Bruce Watson View Post
    My understanding is that Dwayne's is the last lab running the K-14 process (Kodachromes).
    That's true, and not for much longer. Dec. 30, 2010 is the last day they'll do it.
    Frank Schifano

  3. #23
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    Techlab Photo in Baltimore Will run it. I take mine there.

    www.techlabphoto.com

  4. #24

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    Quote Originally Posted by Ektagraphic View Post
    Dale Labs will take it for sure. www.Dalelabs.com They are a great lab.
    I know for a fact that Dale Labs uses Noritsu leader-card machines similar to the type you'd see for a minilab.

    They use a sprocketed card about a foot by a half a foot (30x15cm) to advance the film through each processing tank not the sprockets on the film or the film base itself.

    And since you can only do two rolls per card, and the rolls of film are separate, there's a pretty good chance they'd do it for you.


    Best to call first though, as the drying temperatures of polyester and acetate may be different. I know the driers on Noritsus change temperature for 1- and 220 film because of the different thickness of that material, even though it uses the same acetate as 35mm.

  5. #25

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    I'd just like to say, that polyester films are great for their longevity,
    and slides are important in particular.

    To me the fact that the film will store the memories for my great grand children to see,
    is much more important than a camera.

    Acetate slides can degrade after 40+ years, and convert back to vinegar,
    but polyester slides will be around for centuries 1000+ years.

    If there is a genuine issue about the film at the end of a roll, breaking expensive cameras,
    then it would probably be better to make the material that keeps the film on the roll brake.
    meanwhile can simply use cameras that are either hard to brake, or you wouldn't mind braking.
    For instance, plastic camera's are really cheap, and some of the most durable, since they are so simple.

    Also in terms of developing being "economical",
    if you factor in the amount of money spent on backing up archives,
    then it's economical to get it done properly the first time,
    so the original will be available.

    Even if you only have to backup your archive once in a lifetime,
    it'll still be at least double the cost.

    knowledge is all we can take with us at death,
    so of course, learning to develop yourself,
    is always a valuable skill set to have,
    a potential talent for your next life.
    maybe can review those polyester slides also ;-)
    Last edited by streondj; 10-17-2012 at 12:08 AM. Click to view previous post history.

  6. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by streondj View Post
    Acetate slides can degrade after 40+ years, and convert back to vinegar,
    but polyester slides will be around for centuries 1000+ years.
    Polyester as a film base, has not been around long enough to know how long it lasts, it may last 1000 years, it may only last 20, nobody really knows. Funny thing is, I have an old B&W negative of my Grandparents, it's safety film, so acetate, it's also old enough to collect an old age pension. It has not been well stored, but acetate can last a lot longer then 40 years, if stored properly, and sometimes not so properly. Heck there are still millions of images on nitrate film, still in excellent condition, even though it hasn't been used since the 1940's, for still use.
    Paul Schmidt
    See my Blog at http://clickandspin.blogspot.com

    The greatest advance in photography in the last 100 years is not digital, it's odourless stop bath....

  7. #27

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    Quote Originally Posted by wogster View Post
    Polyester as a film base, has not been around long enough to know how long it lasts, it may last 1000 years, it may only last 20, nobody really knows.
    PET base long term stability of at least 500 years has been proved by the Rochester Institute of Technology.
    The YCM Separation Archival Master the way A.M.P.A.S define it is black-and-white polyester film stock.

  8. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by georg16nik View Post
    PET base long term stability of at least 500 years has been proved by the Rochester Institute of Technology.
    The YCM Separation Archival Master the way A.M.P.A.S define it is black-and-white polyester film stock.
    This kind of testing, is called accelerated age testing, it could be right, it could be wrong, the only for sure way to tell, is to take a piece, let it sit for 500 years, then look at it. Realistically though, beyond my (potential) grandchildren, few people will care about my work, so if my images last another 100 years or so, that's good enough.... I have some 40 year old B&W acetate images, that are like new, so and like I said, an image of my grandparents is ~65 years old, and although it's grainy and the focus isn't great it was probably like that when new, they were farmers, so simple box cameras would have been the rule.
    Paul Schmidt
    See my Blog at http://clickandspin.blogspot.com

    The greatest advance in photography in the last 100 years is not digital, it's odourless stop bath....

  9. #29

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    Once I had a roll of CR200 that had apparently jammed in the lab's machines. It came back uncut and wound on a spool. The film was crumpled towards the end of the roll. All other rolls of CR200 were fine.

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