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  1. #11

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    Thanks hrst. Your room temp is about right for my room in the summer but for the other three seasons 20 deg C is much closer to the room temp.

    pentaxuser

  2. #12

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    Am I hearing this right that you are opting for color filters (CC) instead of a dichroic head? Color print evaluation filters are great, but CCs are a real pain. Since dichroic enlargers are being thrown out all over the place, you may want to get one of those if you can.

  3. #13
    hrst's Avatar
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    Of course dichroic head over color filters. Color filters are just a quick and very cheap way to get started in an existing BW darkroom, but OTOH, why not buy a dichroic enlarger from the start.

  4. #14

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    Yes, or you may be able to get a dichroic head for some enlargers (usually condenser does not work though). I tried putting a dichroic head on an otherwise identical condensor enlarger and it just did not work probably because the condenser lenses couldn't focus the light right.

  5. #15
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    Well, I don't have a dichroic head right now, and I don't have room for another enlarger. It's pretty much the enlarger situation that's keeping me from trying it. I like using my cold light head for B&W and those apparently don't work well with CC filters so I'll probably just sit back and watch the good materials get continued like I've been doing.
    f/22 and be there.

  6. #16

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    As another beginner wanting to get into color printing, I notice that a lot of people seem to be developing in trays at or near room temperature. Can one reliably get good results this way or should I purchase a drum and motor base (difficult to find used)?

    I have an LPL 760 dichroic enlarger and a Beseler 45 (for B&W). A local photo store (Glazers) has a supply of Fuji CA papers, but not the chemicals. I can order the Kodak chems from Calumet, as suggested above. Aside from a special safe light, is there anything else I need? Is there a good tutorial for color printing on the web?

    Thanks!

    Warren Nagourney

  7. #17

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    Hi Warren,
    This may help: http://www.apug.org/forums/forum221/...ing-200-a.html

    One thing you may find useful is the Kodak colour print viewing filters, they help to nail the colour balance.
    Steve.

  8. #18

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    Thanks, Steve!

    Warren N

  9. #19

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    Warren,

    Go with the trays. The issue with color is that it takes quite a few test prints to get filtration right, especially in the beginning.
    Doing it in trays you can get more iterations per hour than with a drum which requires rinsing and drying time.
    Kodak's chemistry works well at room temperature. Just make sure that chemical temperature stays more or less
    constant during the printing session.

    One thing I found extremely helpful to get filtration quickly was a color calculator. Something like this: http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll...m=270665190877

    However, don't buy one until you learn how to get filtration by hand. It's very helpful once you know what you are doing, and
    can get in a way if you don't.

    What else? Make sure you have good ventilation. B/w chemistry smells, but color is worse ;-)
    I don't remember any good online tutorials, but I did not look for them. I just got a couple of books in the library. Call me old-fashioned ;-)

    Anyway, don't over think it. It's not too much harder than b/w. You'll get more confident once you try it.

    Eugene.

  10. #20

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    One other thing. Stick with one film to start with, you'll find that once you've found an approximate filtration, every subsequent roll will be quite close. If you standardise, colour is no more difficult than B&W.
    Steve.

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