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  1. #21

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    I'll second Steve's tip. Staying with one film and one package of paper will save a lot of headache. Also, take one shot of a
    gray card on the film. I took a picture of my left hand holding a gray card. I mounted that shot in a slide frame. This is
    always the first photo I print when I start printing session to make sure that all variables are in place. If the gray card is
    gray, and my left hand looks just the like the one in the freshly developed photo - everything is ready for printing. If the hand looks different, I just take the glove off and check again ;-)

  2. #22

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    Many thanks, Steve and Eugene, for your excellent suggestions. Although I am a bit new to printing, my last 4 rolls of e6 were developed at home, using my temperature stabilized bath. I expect the chemistry side of RA-4 should be easier than that. I agree, the filter settings will take a little fiddling and the suggestion of taking a pic of your hand holding a gray card is brilliant.

    I find the best model of the 3 colors to be negatives of RGB; thus cyan is minus red, yellow is minus blue, etc. This might help in my color calculations.

    As soon as I get a little more experience in B&W, I will plunge into color. (My B&W prints have some funny artifacts I need to sort out.)

    Thanks!

    Warren N

  3. #23

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    Quote Originally Posted by Split70mm View Post
    Yes, or you may be able to get a dichroic head for some enlargers (usually condenser does not work though). I tried putting a dichroic head on an otherwise identical condensor enlarger and it just did not work probably because the condenser lenses couldn't focus the light right.
    I've never seen a dichroic lamp house that uses condensers at all. I think that Omega made one at one point but I've never seen it. All the dichro heads I've seen use a light mixing box and are diffusion type light sources.
    Frank Schifano

  4. #24
    Mainecoonmaniac's Avatar
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    Is there a rental darkroom in your city? I would recommend that?

  5. #25

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    +1 for darkroom rental. Especially if it's got a machine to process prints.

    I'm a little concerned about this talk of colour in open trays-- would defiantly want to have really excellent ventilation with an intake just above the tray and most home darkrooms I've seen don't have it. The thought of breathing in fumes from open trays of blix doesn't appeal much. NB that when we expose ourselves to chemicals we aren't just talking about bad smells, but the possibility of causing permanent chemical sensitivities which get worse over time. Something like a nova slot processor might be easier to manage no?
    Last edited by jpberger; 11-18-2010 at 07:16 PM. Click to view previous post history.

  6. #26
    Mainecoonmaniac's Avatar
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    An RA4 processor would be nice

    Quote Originally Posted by jpberger View Post
    +1 for darkroom rental. Especially if it's got a machine to process prints.

    I'm a little concerned about this talk of colour in open trays-- would defiantly want to have really excellent ventilation with an intake just above the tray and most home darkrooms I've seen don't have it. The thought of breathing in fumes from open trays of blix doesn't appeal much. NB that when we expose ourselves to chemicals we aren't just talking about bad smells, but the possibility of causing permanent chemical sensitivities which get worse over time. Something like a nova slot processor might be easier to manage no?
    An RA4 processor would be nice. Just learning color balance is tough enough. Doing it trays or drums is not easy. A dry to dry processor makes learning easier. Another route is a local college that offers a color printing course.

  7. #27

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    Quote Originally Posted by fschifano View Post
    I've never seen a dichroic lamp house that uses condensers at all. I think that Omega made one at one point but I've never seen it. All the dichro heads I've seen use a light mixing box and are diffusion type light sources.
    Philips made a dichroic lamp housing for a condenser enlarger. It is the model pcs 150 head and it fits into the model pcs 130 condenser enlarger.

    It was an advanced enlarger. It used three lamps with three fixed filters narrow band dichroic RGB filters. That's right, RGB. It used an additive color system, with fairly simple instructions on how the additive system relates to subractive (CMY) filters used in most color enlargers. The color balance was controlled by varying the amount of power applied to the lamps. Philips claimed the lamp controller was designed so that no exposure compensation was required when changing color balance. I understand these enlargers were quite expensive in their day.

  8. #28

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    I find the easiest way to balance is to concentrate on skin, so whenever I'm printing a new type of film or if the light is a bit different I'll make sure I've shot a photo of a person and that will be the frame to balance the colour with. For me, an incorrectly balanced photo is easy to spot on the face of a person.
    Steve.

  9. #29

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    2nd the idea that balancing flesh tones is probably the easiest way to get decent color.

    Also, be sure to view prints for evaluation under as white a light source as possible, ideally daylight. It's hard to accurately judge color under incandescent or fluorescent light.

    -Ed

  10. #30

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    And also make sure they're dry!
    Steve.

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