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  1. #11
    Photo Engineer's Avatar
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    Kodak color paper is dull magenta to cyan in color before processing for 2 reasons. The colors are there as acutance dyes to improve sharpness just as antihalation is used in films. The dyes also trim the speeds so that each batch of paper has the same speed as the last batch.

    PE

  2. #12

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    I'd echo Mike Wilde's suggestion of the Kodak print viewing filter set. My wife could spot the correction straight away although I was never so sure but for spotting and obvious casts it should work even if your slight cast spotting is like mine - not so well developed :

    When you use it make sure you flick the filters in front of the print quickly to prevent your eyes accommodating the change. A good ring-around set of pictures showig the effect of plus and minus CC filters that usually appear in colour printing books is also useful.

    Until you get skilled in correcting colour casts then working by "guess and by God" as they say is very frustrating. Tools are helpful or a good colour analyser which once set up correctly does the hard work for you.

    The other thing I'd get is either a table showing exposure factor changes when adding or substracting Y and M to enable you to recalculate exposure or a calculator dial. Durst for instance made one for its dichroic head. Once you have the right base exposure for density then any filter changes are dialled in to arrive at the new exposure.

    Best of luck

    pentaxuser

  3. #13
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    If you get the full print viewing kit it includes a table for filter factor changes as pack adjustments are made.
    my real name, imagine that.

  4. #14

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    I have a Kodak Color Print Viewing Filter Kit on the shelf above my monitor between my film scanners. I use it when editing color pictures with Picture Window Pro to get hints about what direction to shift the color. Just as applicable there as in the darkroom.

  5. #15
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    Sounds like a good idea on the Color Print Viewing Filter Kit. I'll start running one of those down.

  6. #16
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    And the answer is.....

    75M+68Y @ 7.1 sec f/8 nailed it.

    75M+75Y put it in the ballpark but a little cyan. Kodak's datasheet gives 40M+40Y as the starting point but that was really red.

    Thank you to everyone for your suggestions.

  7. #17
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    Final Thought

    Doesn't color negative film shift red when it gets too old?

  8. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by kb3lms View Post
    75M+68Y @ 7.1 sec f/8 nailed it.

    75M+75Y put it in the ballpark but a little cyan. Kodak's datasheet gives 40M+40Y as the starting point but that was really red.

    Thank you to everyone for your suggestions.
    There are a fair number of variables that affect this.

    My norm is closer to 60m/60y.

    Filter packs differ, Kodak vs. Durst etcetera.

    When film processing differs a bit it can change the filter pack needed.

    In my experience, Pro-Labs are very consistent in matching the C-41 standard, "my" local Mini-Labs a bit less so.

    My own processing has become very reliable and predictable, but that came with some practice over the course of time. That doesn't mean my process would match a test strip perfectly, it also does not mean there have been any failures of the C-41 process, just adjustments at the enlarger.
    Mark Barendt, Beaverton, OR

    "We do not see things the way they are. We see things the way we are." Anaïs Nin

  9. #19
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    The colour temperature of your light source might be unusual.
    Matt

    “Photography is a complex and fluid medium, and its many factors are not applied in simple sequence. Rather, the process may be likened to the art of the juggler in keeping many balls in the air at one time!”

    Ansel Adams, from the introduction to The Negative - The New Ansel Adams Photography Series / Book 2

  10. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by kb3lms View Post
    Doesn't color negative film shift red when it gets too old?
    Coluor paper (at least most Kodak) looses red speed as it ages. I have some that need at least 105Y+80M to just start to come into balance.

    The colour of the base of the c-41 film also varies from film brand to brand, and has an effect on the final pack of filtraton you need.
    my real name, imagine that.

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