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  1. #1
    razocaine_07's Avatar
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    finest 120 colour films

    ive been using Fuji Pro 400H recently and have found that the amount of grain is higher than i expected when using it in low light conditions,
    does anyone recommend a fine 120 colour film that would work well in low light conditions, Id prefer to stay around the 400 iso mark if possible

  2. #2
    mrred's Avatar
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    Its a fine film with a lot of latitude, over expose a little. Any negative film will have that weakness.

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    benjiboy's Avatar
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    At what enlargement size are you experiencing unacceptable grain, and who's processing your 400H ?, because I've had 20"X16" prints from 120 film from this film with very little grain
    Last edited by benjiboy; 12-10-2010 at 02:45 AM. Click to view previous post history.
    Ben

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    2F/2F's Avatar
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    There really won't be a much finer grained 400 color film. I would guess that your grain has to do with lightening underexposed negs during printing. Have you tried pushing the film to raise density in the mid tones and high tones? It increases grain a bit, but it allows you to print the shadows down darker, which gets rid of that washed-over grainy look in the shadows that you get when you try to lighten them in printing.

    FWIW, Pro 400H is probably the finest-grained fast color film I have used, and due to its fourth color layer making color balancing much more easy, it is definitely the best 400 film for low light situations, especially those in mixed light. I am happy with 8x12 enlargements from 35mm pushed two stops, but everyone has their own criteria for acceptable grain.
    2F/2F

    "Truth and love are my law and worship. Form and conscience are my manifestation and guide. Nature and peace are my shelter and companions. Order is my attitude. Beauty and perfection are my attack."

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    Paul Green's Avatar
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    The new Kodak 400 looks very promising http://www.twinlenslife.com/2010/12/...light-new.html

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    Quote Originally Posted by razocaine_07 View Post
    ive been using Fuji Pro 400H recently and have found that the amount of grain is higher than i expected when using it in low light conditions
    Is there a possibility that some under exposure has crept in or maybe your are spotting grain in dark shadow areas? I ask because I've printed 10x8 from 35mm 400H and it's very fine grained. The same size print from 120 film shows no grain to my eye.
    Steve.

  7. #7

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    I find the Fuji Pro films a touch grainy too, and I over expose as a matter of course. For 400 speed the new Portra looks very interesting, or if you don't mind E6, Provia 400X. They say EliteChrome 200 can be pushed a stop easily too.

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    2F/2F's Avatar
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    Overexposure increases graininess, since graininess is tied to density. IME, normal exposure and normal processing together are the best way to minimize grain in C-41 films.

    Pro 400H is just not a grainy film, and especially not in 120. The OP must be printing up thin negs, which makes the grain in the film more apparent.

    In low light situations, whatever advantages in grainlessness might be gained over the 400H by using new Portra 400 (and how big could they really be, given that 400H is not grainy?) would probably be overshadowed by the fact that the four layer technology of the Fuji makes it so much easier to color balance shots made in common low light color temperatures. I love Kodak's films, but Fuji's just plain balance easier when shot in foul lighting.
    2F/2F

    "Truth and love are my law and worship. Form and conscience are my manifestation and guide. Nature and peace are my shelter and companions. Order is my attitude. Beauty and perfection are my attack."

    - Rob Tyner (1944 - 1991)

  9. #9
    markbarendt's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by 2F/2F View Post
    Overexposure increases graininess, since graininess is tied to density. IME, normal exposure and normal processing together are the best way to minimize grain in C-41 films.
    I thought it was the opposite and even got my info from Ilford, here's an out-take from the XP2 fact sheet.

    The best balance of sharpness and grain is obtained when XP2 SUPER is exposed at EI 400/27. However, down-rated or overexposed XP2 SUPER negatives have finer grain, the opposite of that expected and obtained with conventional films.
    What am I missing here?
    Mark Barendt, Ignacio, CO

    "We do not see things the way they are. We see things the way we are." Anaïs Nin

  10. #10
    MikeSeb's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by razocaine_07 View Post
    ive been using Fuji Pro 400H recently and have found that the amount of grain is higher than i expected when using it in low light conditions,
    does anyone recommend a fine 120 colour film that would work well in low light conditions, Id prefer to stay around the 400 iso mark if possible
    Try the new Portra 400 rated at box speed. It is an excellent film.
    Michael Sebastian
    Website | Blog

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