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  1. #11

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    A lot seems to depend on both the care in processing and the storage. I have some E-1 Ektachromes from about 1956 (the film was outdated even then) that are still pleasant to view, although there has been some noticeable shift. I have some E-2 and E-3 Ektachromes and Anscochromes (including High Speed Anscochrome) from before 1960 that are still good, with little change. I also have many that have shifted too much to be useful.

  2. #12

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    nworth's experience would tend to indicate that maybe it's all a crapshoot, especially since families were not thinking fifty years down the road. Our stash was in a closet up against the NW side of the house that gets real hot in the summer. That might explain the demise of so many of the slides, yet those post-1965 ot do ones are fine.

    Or we can just shoot Kodachrome, right? Oh, wait......

  3. #13

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    Ektachrome up to E-3 was pretty wildly unstable, but E-4 was respectable under good storage, and E-6 products have gotten very stable. The "professional" Ektachrome films remained E-3 long after the consumer films (Ektachrome-X and High-Speed Ektachrome) were the more stable E-4 process.

    Note that temperature is really tough on Ektachrome. So the break point in fading may also have to do with when the slides started being stored someplace with air-conditional.

    ASF's Digital ICE3 ROC can work wonders on restoring faded Ektachromes.

  4. #14
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    John;

    After looking at some slides, I have to concur that E1 - E2 were pretty bad, E3 varied a lot. Too much to figure things out, and E4 was a lot better. E6 is quite good, but then there is less keeping on these slides.

    My Anscochromes look pretty good, but then they were ugly to start with. Anscochrome and Super Anscochrome from the 50s was pretty bad to start with. My Fujichromes are good and have stayed good, but my Agfachromes are both good and bad.

    PE

  5. #15

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    Quote Originally Posted by John Shriver View Post
    Ektachrome up to E-3 was pretty wildly unstable, but E-4 was respectable under good storage, and E-6 products have gotten very stable. The "professional" Ektachrome films remained E-3 long after the consumer films (Ektachrome-X and High-Speed Ektachrome) were the more stable E-4 process.

    Note that temperature is really tough on Ektachrome. So the break point in fading may also have to do with when the slides started being stored someplace with air-conditional.

    ASF's Digital ICE3 ROC can work wonders on restoring faded Ektachromes.
    The time point, about 1965, that the slides stopped losing color was at the same time E-3 replaced E-2, so not even that far along.

    I also thought of the air conditioning angle, our house did not get it until 1970. And even then, with the closet doors closed and not terribly effective cooling in this bedroom, I don't think that was the reason for improvement.

    I saw a web page for a "develop anything" service and they showed a severely faded slide that was restored beautifully into B&W! Neat idea.

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