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  1. #31
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    Good luck.

    To dispose of Ferricyanide, add Sodium Sulfite solution. Do this slowly and with stirring. This can then be dumped gradually down most municipal drains in the US without harm if you run lots of water with it. It has rather low toxicity, but I would make sure that it is dumped very dilute. It is by no means like Dichromate.

    I'm not sure what you mean by Disodium Phosphate above, but alkali is usually best for causing hardening to take place in this type of hardener. I don't think I have the formula here, but I can take a look.

    PE

  2. #32
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    My first color photograph was made from a negative with the C22 process, which I bought from Freestyle, mail order color kits. It's one of my favorite prints. I made the enlargement too.

    A question I have for Ron is what is the film like after development. It seems to me that one roll had a very delicate emulsion but dried very nicely, easy to touch at that point.

    This sure does bring back memories. Sigh....

  3. #33
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    In that day and age, Kodak probably used Formalin and Mucochloric acid to harden the film. Even so, it was very soft and mushy when it came out of the process. After drying it was very hard and durable. I never coated a C-22 product as C-41 was "the thing" when I came to work there. It was the major color negative product as was the new family of hardeners.

    PE

  4. #34

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    OK, it has been done. I did get color negatives, for "small values" of color negatives. Here's a portrait of me from about 1968 on Kodacolor-X in an Imperial Satellite 127 camera, with a very tortuous C-22 color processing path.

    Click image for larger version. 

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    I did use some "color correction" in Picture Window Pro to make the fallen leaves more yellow. But I certainly was wearing a red shirt.

    The negatives are quite thin. Of course, they were originally underexposed, I shot them on the "B&W" aperture setting, which is why I thought I shouldn't get them processed way back when. I didn't realize it was just two-thirds of a stop of underexposure.

    The negatives also have a strong overall purple cast. Of course, the dyes have had a lot of time to go bad, and been abused in many ways. The C-22 developer, being a week old, was probably not at it's best, there were beads of (I presume) benzyl alcohol that wanted to stay on the glass inside the bottle. But I was quite careful on temperature control of the C-22 developer, kept it within half a degree of 75F for all 14 minutes.

    Looking at histograms as I scan the pictures, it's obvious that the yellow dye in the negatives is just about non-existent. Cyan dye is strong, and there's a decent showing of magenta.

    All-in-all, it's really quite amazing to get anything in color after 44+ years of abuse.
    Last edited by John Shriver; 01-07-2012 at 02:51 PM. Click to view previous post history.

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