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  1. #21
    accozzaglia's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Photo Engineer View Post
    There were 3 other "Kodachrome" type films made and processed by Fuji, Konica and Dynacolor. This stopped in the 70s, but up to then these companies processed Kodak Kodachrome and other brands along with their own, and did it with either their own slide mounts or generic mounts.

    PE
    For all to know, could you link and share the different K-type brand names with their respective companies above? Cheers.

  2. #22
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    Fuji film = Fujichrome from unknown date but in 40s to about 1975 or 80, then Fujichrome with couplelrs until about 1990 and then Fuji split into Velvia, Astia and etc. The Daibutsu photo in my gallery is taken on the Fujichrome that was ISO 10 and comparable to Kodachrome. It was taken in 1960 IIRC.

    Konika = Konishiroku = Sakuracolor film which was in about the same approximate order as the Fujichrome. K-14 kind did them both in at the same time. I have slides on this film as well. It was ISO 10 and much bluer than Fuji products.

    Both companies had substantive color negative films at this same time, based on Agfa formulas using proprietary processing.

    Dynacolor = Dyanchrome which is a Kodachrome like ISO 10 film that was made until about the time that the ISO 25 Kodachrome came out. The company, founded by former Kodak people, could not keep up. The film was grainier than the last version of ISO 10 Kodachrome and slightly inferior in color. It was made using a very much older Kodachrome formula. I have seen both names used, but Dynachrome is the name of the film. There was a Dynachrome 25 film made with a 3M label and it is not clear whether they bought the company or the name. The 3M factory was about 3 blocks from the Dyanchrome factory.

    I wish I could give better dating, but I can only approximate the Japanese and Dynachrome materials. I have seen one of the Japanese plants in action processing Kodahcrome and Japanese versions back in the early 60s. Does this help?

    PE

  3. #23
    accozzaglia's Avatar
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    Outstanding. It should help others who will ask again in the future (yes, I know, it'll get lost in the shuffle).

  4. #24

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    Here is an enlightening page about Gratispool, which distributed Dynachrome films in the UK.
    http://www.photomemorabilia.co.uk/Gratispool.html
    If this is correct, Dynachrome was first a K-11 process and then later was improved to use a K-12 type process.

    I have some Dynachrome slides from (I believe) 1967 and they're just as sharp and colorful as Kodachromes of the same era. I'm quite sure this is the later "K-12" process Dynachrome. (Meanwhile, our GAF brand slides of the time faded horribly.)

  5. #25
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    Interesting name D235J. At Kodak, CD6 was really named D106J. AFAIK, there was no D235J.

    The K12 version of Dynachrome appears to be their last effort. The plant is now vacant and subject to vandalism having been set afire twice in the last decade. The last Dyanchrome I saw had a 3M label as mentioned above.

    PE

  6. #26

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    Indeed, these slides have cardboard mounts which say 3M Dynacolor on them. So they must be from when Dynachrome was starting to die out. I'll scan a few sometime (including the mounts!), though there's no way that will do justice to the originals!

  7. #27

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    Old films and processes.

    Speaking of old processes, there was red boxed GAF 64 etc. This was an E-3 type process as I remember I had to do a manual re-exposure to a light bulb. I used to process this film at home in my bathtub very successfully using a fish tank heater, as I remember, to maintain the temperature. I think these were the old Ansco films as I recall. It was a very low contrast film with good color and not bad for duping. I liked the film when I processed the film. The old GAF processing by GAF, as I recall, was pretty bad.

  8. #28
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    In the 50s and 60s GAF had a proprietary process that was almost identical to the Ektachrome process and which ran at 75 F. I really don't know what they came out with after that, but they did have a paper compatible with the Kodak paper process, P-122, at that time. I don't know how well it sold. Their reversal print, Printon, was also run through a proprietary process.

    PE

  9. #29

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    PE - That sounds right. Those old GAF slides actually held their color pretty well, much better than my old E3 "Ektachrome Professional" transparencies did. They scan very nicely and have a very long scale, a lot of saturation without blocked up shadows. The GAF processing was so bad the films got a bad rep; but if you did the processing yourself the kits were reasonable, the film cheap and it was not that hard to maintain the temperature.

    ~Steve

  10. #30
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    Steve;

    I did my own processing of Anscochrome and Super Anscochrome. I found that the slides were desaturated and brownish in overall cast but that they kept well. Printon prints were desaturated and kept very well. The E1 slides were wonderful but turned red with keeping. Ektachrome prints of that time have kept well.

    PE

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