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  1. #1

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    Blue Cast with Ektar 100 scanned with Frontier

    New to APUG. Like to use Ektar 100 for macro and noticed this blue cast in the scans. Perhaps I should scan it myself but it is fast and easy to get a disk with the development. The shots were in shadow but not underexposed. I wonder if there
    is a profile or some such for the lab to use to avoid this? Just warming them up a bit in PS did not fully fix it. Thanks for any comments.
    Mike

  2. #2

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    1. Scanning and post processing is usually not discussed at APUG.
    2. Example pictures would help.
    3. Most minilab scans I've seen could use some extra post processing in Photoshop. I'm guessing the blue cast could indeed be fixed in Photoshop.

  3. #3
    keithwms's Avatar
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    There are quite a few reports of inaccurate colors with this film, when it is scanned. I have certainly noted that myself; in some of my scanned shots, the open sky looks cyan and other colors also look inaccurate. Curiously, other reports here on APUG suggest that traditional optical (RA4) printing yields good color balance. It completely mystifies me that Kodak, in this day and age, would be producing a film that scans poorly but prints well via RA4!! Anyway, I don't suppose Kodak will ask me what I think of that strategy

    My suggestion is simply to do an auto white balance adjustment. Or, using photoshop, go to Image/Adjustments/Levels, select the white bottle dropper (on the right of the levels pane in CS4), and use that to select whatever object in your photo should be white. That usually gives a good white balance.

    I am sure someone is about to say this is apug, we don't talk about scanning. In that case you may be referred to dpug, where I will offer the exact same advice.
    "Only dead fish follow the stream"

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  4. #4
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    I've read about color shift if this film is underexposed.

    I'm so late to the game, I have a Propak on ice but haven't tried it yet.

    I'll be watching this.

  5. #5

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    In my experience, the blue cast, in the shadows or elsewhere, can be corrected out. You might need to spend a bit of time in curves. Of course, without seeing an example like I said earlier, we can't know for sure. I don't find this film hard to scan or correct.

  6. #6

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    sounds accurate

    Light in the shadows is definitely bluer in reality so it would make sense it would scan that way. I print it optically and it prints beautifully. I wish they still made portra paper in sheets though, sometimes the Supra is a bit too contrasty for Ektar shot in full sun. I know, I could make contrast-reducing masks, but I just haven't gone down that road yet.

    -Ed

  7. #7
    2F/2F's Avatar
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    While I do agree that this film looks much better in optical prints, it is also worth mentioning that any high saturation and high contrast film is going to be very sensitive to off-color light (e.g. shade or overcast day) and less-than-perfect exposure. In the color negative world, Ektar is probably the most extreme product in this way. Having perfect exposure and filtration helps any film, but this film in particular. You really don't get the best out of this film until you treat it like a transparency film IME. This means near-perfect exposure and proper color correction in camera. After trying it when it first came out, I don't really shoot this stuff except sometimes for product-based still lifes with studio flash.
    Last edited by 2F/2F; 03-01-2011 at 08:32 PM. Click to view previous post history.
    2F/2F

    "Truth and love are my law and worship. Form and conscience are my manifestation and guide. Nature and peace are my shelter and companions. Order is my attitude. Beauty and perfection are my attack."

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  8. #8
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    I took a test roll of it recently. Took shots in shadows and so forth. Unless you severely underexposed it by several stops I don't see how it would be blue tinted.

    I had my prints made with no color correction and it looks great there. I haven't got the scanner to scan the negatives, but others have had no problems with it.

    I would suspect the scanning process was faulty or used the wrong profile. I read an old review where somebody said a similar tint was on the scans but not the negatives or prints. One suggestion offered this was because the shop doing it didn't have the proper scanning color profiles for Ektar 100 yet (or something along those lines).

    I suggest trying to scan them yourself. Maybe print one of them and see if the print looks fine.
    -Markster

    Canon AE-1P 35mm | 50mm/f1.8 FDn | 28mm/2.8 FD | 70-200mm/f4-5 FD | 35-70mm/F2.8-3.5 Sigma FD

  9. #9

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    Quote Originally Posted by 2F/2F View Post
    While I do agree that this film looks much better in optical prints, it is also worth mentioning that any high saturation and high contrast film is going to be very sensitive to off-color light (e.g. shade or overcast day) and less-than-perfect exposure.
    I've over exposed it by several stops and gotten perfectly useable images. While it might not have the exposure latitude of something like Portra, it's still got at least -1/+2.

  10. #10
    2F/2F's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tim Gray View Post
    I've over exposed it by several stops and gotten perfectly useable images. While it might not have the exposure latitude of something like Portra, it's still got at least -1/+2.
    Sure. It is a color neg film, after all. Just by virtue of it being a negative film, it can provide usable results when overexposed. However, this does create changes, and there is a difference between "usable" and "ideal." And Ektar exaggerates these differences more than most color neg films. I am sure the OP's negs are "usable."

    Additionally, my comments were mainly about color, not exposure (though exposure does affect color). Ektar exaggerates color casts, and is harder to correct than some films.
    2F/2F

    "Truth and love are my law and worship. Form and conscience are my manifestation and guide. Nature and peace are my shelter and companions. Order is my attitude. Beauty and perfection are my attack."

    - Rob Tyner (1944 - 1991)

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