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  1. #11
    Athiril's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by lns View Post
    You'll lose detail in the highlights, but that can look kind of interesting and a little ethereal. Actually, it's a look that I've seen emulated by digital wedding photographers. White skin, for example, will lose detail. But especially, for women that can actually be very flattering. If I were a wedding photographer I'd probably overexpose by one stop just for that reason. You may have to worry about blowing the highlights in the dress. But you'll get good detail in the black clothes.

    If your photos were taken in bright sunlight, you might want to pull one stop. Have you talked to your lab?

    -Laura
    No you won't lose detail in the highlights, and dodgied up images blowing out detail in post that's actually there in the original, then colour casting the white point and making it look like "70's" colour (which isn't 70's colour) is amateurish and is almost always cover up of poor photography.

    Pro (not amateur picked up a camera last month) wedding photographers don't blow out skin detail, let alone want to do that on purpose.

  2. #12
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    I had the exact same thing happen this weekend at a friends wedding except I was shooting NC.. spooky. I assumed it would be ok but I'm glad to see confirmation of this.
    If you are the big tree, we are the small axe

  3. #13
    Athiril's Avatar
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    Found some Flickr of 400VC @ 100.


    X'mas brunch by dacookieman, on Flickr

  4. #14

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    Portra 400VC at EI 12. 5 stops overexposed.


  5. #15
    Athiril's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tim Gray View Post
    Portra 400VC at EI 12. 5 stops overexposed.

    Not an APUG issue but I'd like to point out that for flatbed scanners this might cause tremendous noise (since most people will be getting some kind of scan as their output image somewhere in the process), not sure how it is with 400VC, but I know it did with Ektar for me at +4 to +5, but +5 on New Portra 400 handles very well in a 'real world' situation - lighting ratios look like they become significantly lower/compressed.

  6. #16
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    What was the light like at the wedding?

    If it was very contrasty, I would suggest a one stop "pull". If a lot of your shots used on camera flash in a large, otherwise dark room, I'd suggest a two stop pull.

    If it was a cloudy day, with even, flat lighting, you will probably be fine.
    Matt

    “Photography is a complex and fluid medium, and its many factors are not applied in simple sequence. Rather, the process may be likened to the art of the juggler in keeping many balls in the air at one time!”

    Ansel Adams, from the introduction to The Negative - The New Ansel Adams Photography Series / Book 2

  7. #17
    lns
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    Well, Tim and Athiril, I definitely lost detail in the highlights the other day when I overexposed a few shots of the new Portra 400, not in test shots but in actual photos. YMMV, and that's great news. Negative film has a lot of latitude. Of course it depends on the EV range in your photo, and how strong and contrasty the light is. If you are shooting in shade, or indoors in even light, it will be easier to over-expose with less effect. Good point. I do agree and should have been more detailed in my answer. But overexposure will be much more noticeable in strong sunlight, for example. And despite the nice latitude of negative film, it's not endless. There will be some effect, whether it shows up in every photo or not. So I will stand by my experience that if you overexpose two stops you will lose detail in the highlights.

    In fact, I consider the picture in post #13 to be very nicely exposed for the main subject, but also to have lost detail in the highlights where the sun strikes. So perhaps we just have different experiences or expectations. That's why I always learn so much on this forum.

    -Laura

  8. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by lns View Post
    Well, Tim and Athiril, I definitely lost detail in the highlights the other day when I overexposed a few shots of the new Portra 400, not in test shots but in actual photos.
    Laura how were your shots printed?
    Mark Barendt, Ignacio, CO

    "We do not see things the way they are. We see things the way we are." Anaïs Nin

  9. #19
    hrst's Avatar
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    Latitude really is not endless, but it is so long that two stops is quite little in proportion, so if you blow out the highlights with that, you would very probably blow them out even when shot normally. Blowing out also isn't on/off style of thing like in digital cameras. Contrast gets lower and lower, and at some point, your expectation is not met anymore.

    But yes I agree, it is possible to blow out highlights with neg film with two stop overexposure, IF the scene contrast is really huge, and IF your expectations for the highlight contrast are just on the edge. It will then look "a little bit washed out", and it would be "somewhat less washed out" when normally exposed.

    In any case, the most important factor is how the negs are printed. Extreme highlights may need careful dodging and burning or contrast masking, regardless of whether the film was overexposed or not.

  10. #20
    markbarendt's Avatar
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    I do agree that the latitude isn't limitless but I am also always surprised by how much is there.

    One point that needs to be remembered is that paper (like other output types) has a short curve and straight exposure is always "place & fall".

    In a straight exposure of a amply exposed negative, only a certain percentage of the negative's curve will hit the printable part of the paper's curve. Change the exposure through the negative and the placement of all the tones move, still a straight print though.

    If instead, we fix the printing exposure, then changes in camera exposure will change the placement of the tones in the print. Shadows and highlights will move on or off the paper's curve based on the exposure/development of the negative. The other thing that changes though is where the rest of the printable tones fall.

    If say placing a face a stop above middle tone or the white dress 2.5 stops over middle tone is the definition of proper paper exposure, and adjustments to the straight exposure are made, then the highlights from a negative exposed at 400 and one exposed at 100 will be very, very similar, if not indistinguishable.
    Last edited by markbarendt; 03-09-2011 at 07:28 AM. Click to view previous post history.
    Mark Barendt, Ignacio, CO

    "We do not see things the way they are. We see things the way we are." Anaïs Nin

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