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  1. #11

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    If you get automatic prints they won't come back red as the machine will average it out and probably give you some horrible muddy colour.

  2. #12
    jp498's Avatar
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    You may need a blue filter as well or use tungsten film to get the same red. The light source is probably balanced for normal incandesent lighting before the red or OC filter is added to the safelight. If it's a long exposure there may be some reciprocity failure as well, which will be covered with bracketing of course. I too would bet the automatic machine prints will be nasty even when the negatives are good.

  3. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by jp498 View Post
    You may need a blue filter as well or use tungsten film to get the same red. The light source is probably balanced for normal incandesent lighting before the red or OC filter is added to the safelight.
    What? This is completely nonsense. The original light source color temperature before the filter does not matter. Red darkroom filter only passes red, otherwise it won't work as a darkroom filter. Okay, there may also be orange, or yellow, or yellow-green safelights. They look orange or yellow or yellow-green when filmed, depending on their spectrum .

    Of course, our eyes adjust. The red darkroom light looks very red when we first go to the darkroom, but after a while it doesn't look so pure red anymore. The yellow safelight may start looking almost "warm white" after a while. But not quite.

    But why blue filter? Blue filter passes blue and reduces (80A/B/C/D) or blocks other wavelenghts than blue. NO darkroom safelight ever contains blue. Blue filter in darkroom safelights is very close to ND filter. It may be something slightly else (something random) due to impurities or imperfections. No point in using. Of course you can fine-tune the green content by using a 80 filter in the case of yellow-green safelight, but if we are talking about red to orange safelights, I can see no point.

  4. #14
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    An example as an attachment.

    Red fluorescent-type safelight. Expired Fuji Press 800. IIRC, the exposure was by the meter.

    Because of scanning & adjustments by myself, cannot say much how it would have turned in some other workflow.

    There's a Coca-Cola can in the image. White text on red background! Looks like a blank can.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails pimio1.jpg  

  5. #15
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    hrst, I think you're right; My mind has jumbled electronic color balance with film color balance which of course works differently.

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