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  1. #1

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    Reciprocity characteristics of Portra 160 NC?

    Kodak's web site doesn't give reciprocity guidance and just says anything above 100 seconds is not recommended. Well, that's obviously not going to stop me, but I do wonder what to expect? Does anyone have experience shooting the stuff in the 2 - 10 minute range? How did you figure reciprocity and what kind of color shifts did you get (I'm assuming that's the problem)?

    Thanks.

  2. #2
    jd callow's Avatar
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    I have shot this film at exposures in the 30 minute range. I can't tell you exact reciprocity compensation times, but I can tell you how I shoot it. I also have never noticed any colour shifts or crossover from long exposures. This is a wonderful film for long exposures. If, by chance, you over expose the film you have to really overexpose it for the highlights to block up. Mostly on over exposure you just get more shadow.

    I rate the film at 50 iso and bracket in full stops toward over exposure.

    Some examples I had on my hd. They are scans of slides of the actual prints. The prints are far nicer. I suspect the house is in the 1-3min range and the window is around 30sec to min and over exposed hence the detail...
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails eve_12.jpg   eve_17.jpg   det_24.jpg  

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  3. #3
    jd callow's Avatar
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    The 50 iso rating is for night or long -- more than a minute -- shots. Otherwise I rate it from 80-100 iso. Great film wonderful palette.

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  4. #4

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    Thanks, I was hoping you'd reply since you seem to be one of the most knowlegable people on the board WRT color. Okay, I'll give it a shot with full stop brackets.

    Let me tell you, the first steps in color can be daunting if you've only ever done B&W. I wasted two weeks of shooting E100S before realizing I'm just not fond of the oversaturated look.

  5. #5
    jd callow's Avatar
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    thanks Poco, but I think I may just be the most vocal. 160nc will be a nice change from your e100s experience. People spend a lot of time talking about how wonderful tranies are -- and they are --, but some neg films are really nice too. I think neg films tend to be more subtle, which makes them tougher to get excited about. 160 nc has a palette like an oil painting. It does a very very nice job with muted shades of all colours and especially earth tones.

    I do wish more people here shot or discussed colour films. There is a lot of room for experimentation, discovery and general craft with colour.

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  6. #6

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    The reason I was drawn to the idea of tranies is because of their definitive color rendition. What you see is what there is -- if not what there WAS in the original scene. With negative film, so much seems to depend on the printing or scanning ...that's probably the "discovery and general craft" part of what you were saying. Unfortunately, if you don't have the first hints of the "general craft," the "discoveries" mostly amount to disappointments. It's just going to take some work, but that's fine.



 

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