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  1. #11
    mikecnichols's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by hoffy View Post
    OK, thanks. I had often wondered why no one ever mentioned using paper towel to dry the drums. That's what I was going to do. I am assuming that any residual water in the drum will be detrimental to the final print?

    And, as for a second drum, yes, I would like to pick one up.....which in itself is not the most easiest thing to locate around here!


    And thanks for the filter tips. I hope they are written on the box. This I think is going to be the most challenging side of what I am about to start.
    I'm picking up a second drum. I found a few on eBay and on Craigslist.

  2. #12

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    Quote Originally Posted by hoffy View Post
    This I think is going to be the most challenging side of what I am about to start.
    It's not too challenging. You may want to get the Kodak print viewing kit, one sold on here recently:
    http://www.apug.org/forums/forum379/...-unopened.html
    They come up on ebay quite often.

    Stick with one film to start with (or maybe forever) - that certainly helps as you'll find that each subsequent roll has a very similar filter pack which needs only the slightest tweak (or maybe none). It also helps as by shooting only one type of film you'll get to know all its characteristics. Make lots of notes - write the filter pack and time on the back of all your prints for future reference. Fuji Pro films (160, 400, 800) all print on the same pack for me - hopefully Kodak's new Portras do the same (there used to be big difference between VC & NC).

    For your very first print choose a frame in normal light - not some difficult mixture of artificial and daylight. Lastly, this thread helped me a lot:

    http://www.apug.org/forums/forum221/...ing-200-a.html

    Particularly this:

    -If print is too RED, dial +5cc MAGENTA and +5cc YELLOW, print will turn lighter
    -too GREEN, dial -5cc MAGENTA, turns darker
    -too BLUE, dial -5cc YELLOW, turns darker
    -too CYAN, dial -5cc MAGENTA and -5cc YELLOW
    -too MAGENTA, dial +5cc MAGENTA, turns lighter
    -too YELLOW, dial +5cc YELLOW, turns lighter
    Steve.

  3. #13
    hrst's Avatar
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    I wrote down the filter values behind the print when I started. Frankly speaking, I have never looked the values again, but in any case, writing them down WILL help you learn them more quickly, as you can make a connection in your head with the print you have in your hands and the filtration values. This is an important point in learning process.

    In the beginning, I often had to do two or three test strips before the final print.

    After making about 50 or so prints, I found that most of the time I could get both the filtration and exposure very close to what I want with the very first test sheet, and the second one is the final print. Then, if I have more images on the same roll of film that are similar in lighting conditions and exposure, I make the final prints directly.

    In some special cases, I have needed two test strips. For example, Fuji Reala is surprisingly green which you will notice if you try to print it with the standard filter pack. I needed about -15M or something like that. Or, once I accidentally forgot to pour prewash water out when I developed C-41 and thus developed with developer diluted 1+1 or even more.... which resulted in twisted color balance which I was able to correct well enough just with filter pack.

  4. #14
    mikecnichols's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by perkeleellinen View Post
    It's not too challenging. You may want to get the Kodak print viewing kit, one sold on here recently:
    http://www.apug.org/forums/forum379/...-unopened.html
    They come up on ebay quite often.

    Stick with one film to start with (or maybe forever) - that certainly helps as you'll find that each subsequent roll has a very similar filter pack which needs only the slightest tweak (or maybe none). It also helps as by shooting only one type of film you'll get to know all its characteristics. Make lots of notes - write the filter pack and time on the back of all your prints for future reference. Fuji Pro films (160, 400, 800) all print on the same pack for me - hopefully Kodak's new Portras do the same (there used to be big difference between VC & NC).

    For your very first print choose a frame in normal light - not some difficult mixture of artificial and daylight. Lastly, this thread helped me a lot:

    http://www.apug.org/forums/forum221/...ing-200-a.html

    Particularly this:
    After working with Fuji 200, I printed from Ektar 100 a couple weeks ago and the adjustment was very slight. I went ahead and made a new program with my analyzer, but it really wasn't much of a difference. I think it was like, +10Y.

  5. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by perkeleellinen View Post
    It's not too challenging. You may want to get the Kodak print viewing kit, one sold on here recently:
    http://www.apug.org/forums/forum379/...-unopened.html
    Might be worth dropping anna pm in response to "another-drop-off-yesterday" - If I read it correctly, there is a set of filters in the box.

  6. #16
    hoffy's Avatar
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    I was given a filter kit a while ago, so I have that one covered as well.

    I also have a fujimoto enlarger with a built in colour analyzer sitting in my shed. I haven't gotten it up and running and was planning on selling it, but might dust it of and give it a try (I am using an LPL 7700 currently)

  7. #17
    hoffy's Avatar
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    OK, next question (if anyone is listening). Should I be storing the paper in the Fridge or freezer? It clearly states store below 10deg C. Would there be any benefit to storing in the freezer. or is it just like film and doesn't matter?

    Cheers

  8. #18
    hrst's Avatar
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    Paper keeps quite well in just fridge at about +10 C. I'd say about 2 or 3 years, or even more. However, if you feel like stockpiling, seal the paper in airtight plastic baggage, put in the freezer, and before using, let warm for a few hours before opening the package.

  9. #19
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    Even though I haven't done RA-4 processing for some years (I was a professional printer at one time), I used to process RA-4 at home in drums and have a suggestion that may be helpful to some here. Don't dry your drums! There is no need to. It is not only a complete waste of time but it actually introduces problems. The reason many dry their drums is to avoid streaks in paper if a drop of water gets on the dry paper and it can be very difficult to avoid having a drop of water from the drum or cap remaing after drying. The solution is easier, much faster, and more dependable. It completely eliminates the drying step that will greatly slow you down and cause problems. Rince your drums and use them wet! Put your paper in the wet drum and then give the paper a quick water pre-soak In other words, don't even try to keep your paper dry until the developer step. Instead of going to lengths to avoid a drop of water getting on the paper, soak the paper! Streaking will be totally avoided.

    When I first started processing RA-4 prints in drums, I dried the drums with a hair dryer but it also caused problems and really slowed the process down. The drum has to cool thorougly or it will raise chemistry temperatures and, if the plastic of the drum is thicker in places , it will cool more slowly there and cause streaking in the prints.

    So just rinse the drums throughly and use them wet with a pre-soak. This same principle is often used with film as well. When I first tried this, I smacked myself in the forehead for not thinking of it sooner and wasting so much time previously. Once I started just using the drums wet with a quick water rinse before the developer step, I eliminated all the problems caused by drying drums and printing was MUCH faster. I am actually suprised that people here have recommended drying the drums because using wet drums has long been known for processing film.

    If you have been drying your drums, try using them wet. You will never look back and you will kick yourself for ever having gone to all the trouble of drying them.
    Last edited by ZoneIII; 03-15-2011 at 03:33 PM. Click to view previous post history.

  10. #20
    hoffy's Avatar
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    Interesting that you say that ZoneIII. The leaflet that came with the tetenal kit suggested that pre-soaking was not a good idea. When you started to pre-soak, did you have to alter your processing times?

    Cheers

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