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  1. #41
    c6h6o3's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ymc226 View Post
    This is my first try at color in any film. I just bought Kodak Ektar 120 and need some advice on shooting outdoors regarding skin tones. Usually to get the skin tones in B&W in the shade I desire, I cut EI to half of what the box states.

    Do I do the same for color or do I just go with box speed? BTW I am using a Fuji GSW690III with a Voigtlander II reflectance meter.
    Caucasian skin is generally Zone VI. So simply meter the skin at box speed and then open it up one.

    This was shot that way on Ektar:

    Click image for larger version. 

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    I love the way it renders skin tones.
    Jim

  2. #42
    Athiril's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by hrst View Post
    And, Kodak recommends Ektar for fashion photography - that usually involves some skin, too .

    Portra is just guaranteed to render many different skin types in a very predictable manner, based on years of experience from Kodak on skin tone test shootings involving models with different skin types, in different kind of lightings.

    Ektar is not specifically designed for skin tones (unlike the Portras, as the name suggests), but this does not mean Ektar wouldn't be able to render skin tones nicely. I have very good results, too. Definitely nothing like Velvia. Testing how it exactly looks with different skin tones is just left to user.

    Kodak's representative has said in interviews that they are happy to see that people find their products even more flexible than they market them. IIRC, he specifically mentioned how Ektar can be used in portraits and Portra in landscapes. lol.

    There are no rules in photography, and there is no absolute "best" or "worst". This is always up to tastes and needs.
    And Ektar also isn't "garish" at all... people seem to be copypasta'ing what they read on the net from someone else and not putting their money where their mouth is.

    A photo of skin tones next to a red object will reveal that the film isn't "garish" or overly red (and in fact does very well for subtle gradiations in red objects itself) but their work flow/reproduction method is what is "garish".

  3. #43
    benjiboy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Athiril View Post
    So you're restig your "case" on a tag line rather than with critical thinking and evidence?
    No, I base my thinking on my experience of shooting a lot of both films and comparing the results, I don't dispute that Ektar is a wonderful general purpose colour neg. film that can be used for portraiture at a pinch, but is not the best film for producing natural skin tones in various different lighting conditions that Kodak Portra or Fuji Pro 160S films that were specifically devised for portrait work do.
    Last edited by benjiboy; 03-22-2011 at 05:55 AM. Click to view previous post history.
    Ben

  4. #44
    c6h6o3's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by benjiboy View Post
    No, I base my thinking on my experience of shooting a lot of both films and comparing the results, I don't dispute that Ektar is a wonderful general purpose colour neg. film that can be used for portraiture at a pinch, but is not the best film for producing natural skin tones in various different lighting conditions that Kodak Portra or Fuji Pro 160S films that were specifically devised for portrait work do.
    I agree. Even though I like the look of Ektar in certain situations, Portra yields the most natural skin tones among currently available films, and even it can't hold a candle to many of the discontinued Kodak color films. (Pro 100T,Vericolor III, Ektachrome 64T). I would've used Portra 160 NC to make the picture I posted above had I had any at the time.

    The photo posted above was made at sunset with flash fill, so it's probably not a good benchmark for color rendition.
    Last edited by c6h6o3; 03-22-2011 at 12:28 PM. Click to view previous post history.
    Jim

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