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  1. #21

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    Shame that the teachers are/have not taught them about film. I agree with the OP that film does have a distinct quality to it. I guess that's why we're on a film forum.... Even looking at those photographs, there is a certain charm in them. I remember when I first started my photo course back in college. Our first project was learning about the film camera and there was no digital involved. I definitely didn't appreciate it then but as time came closer to today, film started to grow on me. Its not to the point that I find myself only using digital for certain specific things...

    I just find it a bit unfortunate that while getting out of uni with £20,000 worth of debt (min you, I'm only 19 and havent been through it myself) that they're teachers have only taught them digital. No doubt that the future is digital, but that doesn't mean that people aren't happy with how things once were,and want to continue with their passion for film in the modern day.

  2. #22

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    I am not so sure what my film background has done for me as I am here now but it has gotten me here I will say that. The new photographers can learn so quickly on DSLR's but do they realize what there is to learn? Are they learning lighting, exposure, emotional captures, fill flash techniques? Are they learning marketing and how to make money to survive? Shooting multiple pics and looking at the immediate results does not necessarily mean that they see these essential things.
    I am putting my B&W darkroom together again, after looking at some of my 11x14 model pics from the studio that I used to work at in Chicago in the 80's. Why give up all of the lessons learned there as I perfected my lighting and processing techniques?

  3. #23
    Sirius Glass's Avatar
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    Welcome to APUG!

    I echo the choice Kodak Gold 200.

    Do not let the school control your life choices. In the past I was an Electrical Engineering & Computer Science professor for a decade and there is some truth in
    Those that can, do
    Those that can't, teach
    Those that can't teach, teach others to teach
    Warning!! Handling a Hasselblad can be harmful to your financial well being!

    Nothing beats a great piece of glass!

    I leave the digital work for the urologists and proctologists.

  4. #24

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    You specifically asked for softer colors and not too much contrast. Kodak Portra 160NC used to be the choice for this sort of thing. The new Portra 160 has somewhat more intense colors, but it still may work for you. Fuji Astia, a transparency film, was outstanding at this sort of thing (a shock for a transparency film), but I'm not sure of its current availability.

  5. #25
    EASmithV's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Shadowtracker View Post
    Also, tell your school "Film Is NOT Dead!" and that much about photography in general is learned by developing/printing film.

    My skills are much improved as a result of taking film classes in b&w and in color (they teach the printing of color, and this has taught me quite a lot about what to look for and how to control it; they don't teach developing color film because the temperature controls are so tight and that's not realistic in a community college).

    pfft, i do it in a sink with a fish tank heater
    www.EASmithV.com

    "The camera is an instrument that teaches people how to see without a camera."— Dorothea Lange
    http://www.flickr.com/easmithv/
    RIP Kodachrome

  6. #26
    wogster's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by williamkazak View Post
    I am not so sure what my film background has done for me as I am here now but it has gotten me here I will say that. The new photographers can learn so quickly on DSLR's but do they realize what there is to learn? Are they learning lighting, exposure, emotional captures, fill flash techniques? Are they learning marketing and how to make money to survive? Shooting multiple pics and looking at the immediate results does not necessarily mean that they see these essential things.
    I am putting my B&W darkroom together again, after looking at some of my 11x14 model pics from the studio that I used to work at in Chicago in the 80's. Why give up all of the lessons learned there as I perfected my lighting and processing techniques?
    One thing I find interesting, most of the stuff I learned in film photography, applies just as well to digital imaging. Lighting, exposure, capture, fill flash, they all apply, picking the right film speed, yeah, higher ISO's are noisier to slower ones, evaluating an image for exposure and colour balance, just as much. Darkroom stuff, not so much...
    Paul Schmidt
    See my Blog at http://clickandspin.blogspot.com

    The greatest advance in photography in the last 100 years is not digital, it's odourless stop bath....

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