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  1. #51
    hpulley's Avatar
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    Yes, most of what I printed last night was expired film developed in past capacity Tetenal, printed on expired paper so I guess I shouldn't be surprised that it isn't standard filter pack.

    I got my long roll for under $30 so again, no complaints.

    Daylight viewing station? I wonder if I could replace my flourecent tubes with something that would give me daylight balance? Must be, I'll check the store.

    How long do you develop at 65F? In the dead of winter that's the temp I'll be at in the basement at night unless I bump up the thermostat.
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  2. #52
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    Can one really trust daylight fluorescents to be truly daylight balanced? I thought they had band gaps that will prevent getting a good determination if you have colors that fall in the gaps.
    Last edited by michaelbsc; 04-09-2011 at 03:45 PM. Click to view previous post history.
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  3. #53
    Greg Davis's Avatar
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    Kodak recommends using Cool White Deluxe fluorescent bulbs. Specifically they say a bulb that has a temperature of 5000K ±1000, color rendering index of 85-100, an and illuminance of at least 538 lux. If you want a mixed lighting condition, add a frosted 75 watt tungsten bulb for every pair of fluorescent bulbs. If you have an incident meter then you can use the EV function to measure the lux, or a reflectance meter and gray card as described in this Kodak publication.

    Of course, there are some very expensive light bulbs specifically for judging color prints. They are nice, but pricey.
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  4. #54
    hrst's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by hpulley View Post
    Daylight viewing station? I wonder if I could replace my flourecent tubes with something that would give me daylight balance? Must be, I'll check the store.
    No!!!

    View the prints under the same kind of conditions where you are going to view the final prints. It is the only way.

    "Daylight" fluorescent tubes ONLY if you are going to view the prints under "daylight" fluorescents, or daylight.

    Normal room lighting is usually the best bet, IMO, or a combination of different lights (warm fluorescent, daylight fluorescent, incandescent) to give you an overall "touch" what the print looks like in different lights.

    If your darkroom is painted in dark colors and use a spotlight to evaluate the prints, you probably tend to make the prints too dark as you see the prints very clearly against the dark background. But when you view then in a light environment, they look too dark.

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