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  1. #1
    Jim Moore's Avatar
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    Color Negative Film / Paper Advice Needed...

    I discovered this building last weekend and would like to return to photograph it in color with my 4x5.

    As I have never shot anything in large format using color film before and would like some advice on what film/paper combination would be a good choice. I will be doing the processing myself.

    Thanks!

    Jim


    "You miss 100% of the shots you don't take"...Wayne Gretzky

  2. #2
    roteague's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by JMoore
    As I have never shot anything in large format using color film before and would like some advice on what film/paper combination would be a good choice.
    Velvia F100. It isn't as saturated as the old films, but is very sharp. It's now my standard choice for film.
    Robert M. Teague
    www.visionlandscapes.com
    www.apug.org/forums/portfolios.php?u=2235

    "A man who works with his hands is a laborer; a man who works with his hands and his brain is a craftsman; a man who works with his hands and his brain and his heart is an artist" -- Louis Nizer

  3. #3
    Jim Moore's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by roteague
    Velvia F100. It isn't as saturated as the old films, but is very sharp. It's now my standard choice for film.
    Thanks for the advice Robert.

    What would be a good paper for printing something like this on?

    Thanks again!

    Jim
    "You miss 100% of the shots you don't take"...Wayne Gretzky

  4. #4
    jd callow's Avatar
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    If you use velvia, you will be abliged to use R3000 (reversal paper), CibaChrome, or have it scanned and printed digitally.

    R3000 are often not so great, Ciba's are wonderful and would do the setting justice.

    If it was the colour I was after I would shoot it with a chrome and crossprocess it and print it on Glossy Crystal Archive C, Fuji/dura flex or a gloss Ultra paper.

    If not crossprocessed and depending upon the light and time of day I would use 160 NC, 160VC or maybe NPS. Sunrise or sunset I'd lean toward NC or VC. Mid day is tough and I don't know what to recommend.

    Early evening, if there are streetlights or some form of man made illumination I'd shoot it with Portra 100T or NPL. If there is not manmade illumination, bring your own (as in car headlights) and light it your self.

    Regardless, the paper recommendations remain the same.

    I Rate the film as follows:
    Short exposures:
    NC, VC 80-100iso
    100t 80 iso
    NPL 60-80 iso

    Longer exposures under manmade light
    NC, VC, 100t, NPL 50 iso

    I also would bracket for over exposure, especialy as the light thins. This is where the Kodak prodyucts really shine. If it were made in 4x5 NPC, Reala, 400UC (and I suspect 100UC) would make this thing jump.

    *

  5. #5

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    Jim,
    If you want a print, use color neg film. In sheet film, I like Kodak Portra 160 NC or Portra 400 NC both have good reciprocity and good latitude. in smaller formats (roll film) the 400UC and 100UC are REALLY nice (the best color neg films available, IMO).

    For paper, Kodak Supra Endura. Great color, neutrality and archival qualities. I like the "N" surface, but lustre surface is good, too. I'm shooting more and more color lately (my version of going over to the dark side ). If only color darkroom printing weren't such a pain in the ass. My productivity has gone way down, meaning lots more potentially good color negs than I'll ever get to print.
    Take care,
    Tom

  6. #6

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    printing a transparency

    There are a couple of choices. Have made or make an internegatve using either the Fuji or Kodak internegative film. This is most likely the way to get a C print. You will most likely need to get this made at a pro lab. From that point it is like any color negative. Since you have greens and reds I think that you would like the results using Fuji Crystal Archive. There is no reason that you could not use and be happy with Kodak, Agfa or Konica paper.

    The second choice offers the very finest results available and is very demanding. Make color separation negatives on black & white film including masks for contrast and color correction...Color correction in this context means to use masking to eliminate dye impurities that are present in the transparency and paper being printed upon. It requires a pin registered system both at the easel and negative carrier. The resulting prints could be any of the following Dye transfer, Three ciolor carbon, Three color carbro,
    or a C print. I would not think that this is the way to go to start printing color. It is hard to find the pin registered equipment. The skills are not easily learned. The equipment expense is not minimal.



 

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