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  1. #31
    Athiril's Avatar
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    That's not pure physics, it's pure speculation. It's making the assumption the last stop of dynamic range is falling neatly right at the cut off point. Portra 400 captures a long range below midtones. You would need a very high contrast scene from mid tones to shadows to do that. There's no detail in the scene @ 1600 I shot that was lost., and that is high contrast if you include the deepest shadows under the step, without that (like any more normal scene) the dynamic range below mid tones is quite short.

  2. #32
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    Athiril,

    No guessing, conjecture, or speculation. Simple math/physics.

    If Portra has "x" stops below mid-tone available when shot at EI 400 and we expose it at EI800 instead then at that exposure the same mid-tone is 1-stop closer to the toe and it has x-1 stops below mid-tone available, 1-stop of shadow detail below mid-tone is never caught. At 1600, x-2, etcetera...

    Separate from that math issue is the "does losing a stop or two matter?" question.

    Do we lose anything of consequence in the print? In your example, no. That is Cool! Heck there might even be more detail on the neg that you didn't even use.

    It is normal not to print everything on the neg.
    Mark Barendt, Ignacio, CO

    "We do not see things the way they are. We see things the way we are." Anaïs Nin

  3. #33
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    Not to hijack the thread but these are some good results for a 5 stop difference...People just don't get the advantages of film and when I say that too people regarding you sample image they go, really? Yes really..Thanks for post.



    Quote Originally Posted by Athiril View Post


    The below shot is exposed for the shade (incident metered in the shade) there is 5 stops of different in the direct sun and shade in this particular scene (via incident metering in both), I did this to get good mid tones in the shade, yet I have simultaneously good mid tones in both, though the image is of lower contrast as a consequence of this exposure. But when your subject is mixed over hard sun light and shade with a huge contrast difference, that is a benefit.


    OCAU Melb Photowalk Week 2 #11 by athiril, on Flickr

  4. #34
    Tony-S's Avatar
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    OK, so what's the verdict? I shot a roll of Portra 400 at ISO 800. Do I develop 3.5 min at 102F like usual, or change the time and/or temp?

  5. #35
    Athiril's Avatar
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    Should be 3min 15sec, and 3min 45sec iirc for +1 stop push. It's better pushed as opposed to simply underexposed, but at only 1 stop, it's not important at all imho.

  6. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by Athiril View Post
    Should be 3min 15sec, and 3min 45sec iirc for +1 stop push. It's better pushed as opposed to simply underexposed, but at only 1 stop, it's not important at all imho.
    +1
    Mark Barendt, Ignacio, CO

    "We do not see things the way they are. We see things the way we are." Anaïs Nin

  7. #37

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    Interesting thread to the extent that I see it affecting my photography, especially with reference to shooting meter-less cameras and more color film. For a long time I preferred not shooting a 35 camera without an incorporated working meter, and using a handheld, as it was just to slow for me in certain circumstances of changing light and catching a subject (usually street) at a certain moment in time. I was just to aware of trying to always nail the exposure. With what I read here I feel that I can meter once, take an average and just work the aperture ( if need be) without worrying about lining up a meter needle. It's kind of a freeing thought and will bring new life to my drawer of bodies with bad meters.
    W.A. Crider

  8. #38
    markbarendt's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by waynecrider View Post
    Interesting thread to the extent that I see it affecting my photography, especially with reference to shooting meter-less cameras and more color film. For a long time I preferred not shooting a 35 camera without an incorporated working meter, and using a handheld, as it was just to slow for me in certain circumstances of changing light and catching a subject (usually street) at a certain moment in time. I was just to aware of trying to always nail the exposure. With what I read here I feel that I can meter once, take an average and just work the aperture ( if need be) without worrying about lining up a meter needle. It's kind of a freeing thought and will bring new life to my drawer of bodies with bad meters.
    I "set and forget" a fair bit for street shooting where I just want to spin focus and shoot.

    Typically when I walk into a situation like that I'll meter once to place faces in the darker settings (like open shade at a mid-day street fair) in zone v (EI 800) or even zone iv (EI 1600), instead of the normal zone vi (EI 400). Basically I'm picking a workable setting for the shadows, from there I know I can get workable faces with reasonable detail around them in a 5-stop range with Portra (and Superia 400 and Delta 400 and other negative film's).

    Coincidentally that is close to what a Holga or disposable is designed to give you with 400 speed film. ~f/11 @ 1/100

    Shooting later in the day with a Holga you may want to push-process the film 1, in the evening 2, at night 3.

    In your meter-less 35mm camera you can just open up more.
    Mark Barendt, Ignacio, CO

    "We do not see things the way they are. We see things the way we are." Anaïs Nin

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