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  1. #21

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    Really? Yeah I wasn't intentionally going to do so. Maybe the lowest setting will give me the right temp?

    It says I can control the temperature using a knob. I'll do a test to see what temp the lowest setting gives me to be on the safe side. Thanks for the heads up!

  2. #22
    brucemuir's Avatar
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    I dot lose much temp over the 3:15 time for C41 but E6 can drop enough to cause problems.

    I monitor closely and stick the tank in the bath between inversions.

    I testing a pull for E6 right now on some expired EPP.

  3. #23
    Athiril's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ashokgoyal42 View Post
    How does one control the temperature for the crucial developer process in C41?

    I've been heating the Patterson film holder so that the heat doesn't dissipate but despite that when I pour the developer at 39 degrees - it shows 37 within a few seconds.

    Should I set the developer at 40C and then let it fall to 38? Any ideas?
    Depends on your ambient before presoak, I was using ~44c and it would drop to 38c.

    I just use 45c+ water presoak, agitate so heating is even, check temp is ~40c, check dev is right temp, pour out water, pour in dev, go for 3m 15s, negs using replenished flexicolor come out fantastic.


    In a patterson tank with ~14c ambient temp I haven't had a temp drop, nor with 6min Kodak E-6 (replenished), if you're worried, just a water bath in the sink shall do.

    Beware using steel in a water, any temp change in the sink will translate to a change in your tank.

  4. #24
    brucemuir's Avatar
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    I just finished my run of e6
    ambient is around 74f in processing area
    Paterson plastic tank and reels
    water bath at around 108 to start and let drift down to 104f

    I tempered critical solutions to about 102-104 and kept an eye during the entire 5:45 1st dev time (slight pull tests to control a magenta shift in expired EPP)
    Presoak at 104f drifted down to 101-102 at first.

    It was pretty easy to keep the temp right around 101f. (you can check the patterson tanks throughout)

    The plastic tanks may be the way to go for E6 although I almost exclusively used stainless for C41.

  5. #25

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    This is a situation where metal tanks have an advantage over plastic ones. They come up to temperature in a few seconds. A cheap styrofoam cooler works well as a water bath. The time in the developer is so short that there is little chance the system cooling down appreciably. I never use a presoak as it is unnecessary for metal tanks.
    Last edited by Gerald C Koch; 07-20-2011 at 11:41 PM. Click to view previous post history.
    A rock pile ceases to be a rock pile the moment a single man contemplates it, bearing within him the image of a cathedral.

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  6. #26
    brucemuir's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gerald C Koch View Post
    This is a situation where metal tanks have an advantage over plastic ones. They come up to temperature in a few seconds.
    I agree for C41 Jerry,
    I'm still on the fence for E6 though.
    The longer times can drift a but with ss but plastic doesn't loose the heat so fast.

  7. #27
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    I prefer plastic Paterson tanks for C-41, they hold the heat very well and more importantly they don't leak all over the place. I still have 1L of solutions after 24 rolls! Temperature drops very little.

    Thin plastic bottles heat up fairly quickly but thick ones take too long to heat up.
    Harry Pulley - Visit the BLIND PRINT EXCHANGE FORUM

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  8. #28

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    It's currently 38C outside here. An excellent day to take in the (not so) fresh air and do your C-41 outside! Just a heads up :P

    All jokes aside, I doubt taking your chems outside on hot days like today would be feasible enough. Would it?
    Last edited by little-infinity; 07-21-2011 at 02:21 PM. Click to view previous post history.

  9. #29
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    I run my water bath in a cooler that holds about 12L of liquids, between the 1L plastic or glass chemical storage bottles and the surrounding water bath.
    I have it fitted with a 300W aquarium glass tube immersion heater and aquarium water pump to ensure the water bath stays moving and unithermal thoughout the bath.
    The OEM stops on the mechanical thermostat have been broken off to allow me to set it to 39C.

    There is not enough room in this small water bath at the start to warm the fixer bottle when I run E6, but it warms to 32C by sticking it in after the CD has finished.
    The up side to the small water bath is that it is easy to empty and store when it is not needed.

    I keep the stainless 1L tank in the water bath between agitations.

    I find that chemistry will come from 18C to 38C in about 1 hour or so, when you start with a pre heated water bath. This is achieved by using mostly the hot water tap to yield a 45C mix. agitating the developer bottles after a few minutes help if you store developers in glass.

    Left overnight with the lid mostly covering the top, there is no problem keeping temperature, even though in winter the house thermostat drops back to 16C.
    my real name, imagine that.

  10. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by olleorama View Post
    Hello, I have said this before, but I hope it will be helpful:

    Stuff you need:
    *Semi-insulated or insulated container. No need for insulation per se, but makes the whole thing more efficient, I use a cooler chest.
    *PID-thermostat, very cheap from china via ebay, or expensive thru your local industry supplier
    *PT100 sensor, as above
    *Depending on the pid-thermostat you might need a relay, best is a solidstate relay
    *Heating element (I use a 300W travel immersion water heater)

    This gives you a very consistent setup for little money. Mine cost less than $50 bucks. And it's self calibrating and extremely adaptable. Could be used for a large tank for huge RA4 printing drums, or a small thing for doing single rolls of 35mm.
    That's very interesting, but very challenging for the DIY-challenged like me. I looked on search engines for PID-thermostat, PT100 sensor, I get what you mean, but how do one assemble all those things?

    A PID-thermostat is something that controls boilers. How do I connect it to a heating element?
    A PT100 sensor is shown (the one I found) with some kind of a round connector. How do I connect it to the PID-thermostat? Is the thermostat voltage-dependant? Do I need to earth some of the above?

    Is there somewhere (maybe here on APUG, or somewhere else) a "dummy guide" that specifies exactly what one must look for (without margin for buying errors) and how to connect all the pieces, without margins for fires and shortcircuits? A guide that lets you go to the home-improvement store with a list of things to buy, and lets you assemble them at home, unfailingly well?

    Things that look easy for those who know, look mysterious for those who don't know, you know
    Fabrizio Ruggeri fine art photography site: http://fabrizio-ruggeri.artistwebsites.com
    Stock images at Imagebroker: http://www.imagebroker.com/#/search/ib_fbr

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