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  1. #1

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    Carbon Dioxide compressed air - good at stopping oxidation?

    I am waiting on the delevery of the first half of my kodak RA-4 chemicals, and i decided to go to the computer shop and buy some compressed air, to use as a replacment for the tetenal butane spray. Would carbon dioxide be just as effective? It is only half the price! Especially when i mix my first 1L batch when i get the second half, to keep the air off parts B and C. (squirt, screw on cap quickly)
    Would this be as effective as the butane stuff? Much safer in my opinion!

  2. #2

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    the carbon oxide will push out all the oxygen so it will work fine!!! and it will be a lot safer then butane... keep in mind that CO2 is heavier then air, so you can even "pour" in the gas ;-)
    but don't store your co2 supply in your cellar dark room, if it leaks it will fill up your dark room and you can't see or smell it.
    Tom

  3. #3

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    :-) perfect My darkroom is permantly set up under the stairs It is so much cheaper than getting the tetenal butane spray and in this economy its best to save money! My working solutions are kept in airtight zoom bottles I hadn't thought of the leakage but i ventilate the room for 5 minutes before each session and take breaks every 10 minutes

  4. #4
    Steve Smith's Avatar
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    Carbon dioxide forms carbonic acid when dissolved in water so it might not be a good idea.


    Steve.

  5. #5

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    If that is indeed the case, then it would do more harm to developers than to fixer. I could look for a nitrogen based can if carbonic acid will be a problem.

  6. #6

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    If you decide to go with nitrogen here's a possible short term approach: many tire shops now use nitrogen instead of ambient air for filling tires (Costco does, other tire shops do so on an optional basis). It might be possible to take a small tire tube (a lawn tractor sized tube might work well) and have it filled with nitrogen.

    Or, one of those 5 gal tanks used for filling tires. You could replace the valve for filling tires with a blower type valve.
    "Far more critical than what we know or do not know is what we do not want to know." - Eric Hoffer

  7. #7

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    Are you sure your can contains CO2? Many of those "dusters" actually contain flammable gas....
    Develop, stop, fix.... wait.... where's my film?

  8. #8
    michaelbsc's Avatar
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    CO2 will absolutely screw up the pH of the developer.

    Look for the wine saver stuff.
    Michael Batchelor
    Industrial Informatics, Inc.
    www.industrialinformatics.com

    The camera catches light. The photographer catches life.

  9. #9
    Mainecoonmaniac's Avatar
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    I think the wine save stuff is argon which is inert. I think co2 is not. It will probably acidify your developer. I think that's why soda water is slightly sour tasting.

  10. #10
    Hexavalent's Avatar
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    Similar to the "wine saver" products, there are some made for preserving wood varnishes and the like : mostly argon, and having to not meet fancy food-product regulations, a bit cheaper.
    - Ian

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