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  1. #11

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    How about Sensia?

  2. #12

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    They are all good ones. Try some of each. Remember, there are three types of Velvia:

    50: http://www.kenrockwell.com/fuji/velvia-50.htm. Very high saturation, warmer yellows.
    100: http://www.kenrockwell.com/fuji/velvia100.htm. Very high saturation, cooler yellows.
    100F: http://www.kenrockwell.com/tech/velvia100f.htm. High saturation, better skin tones.

    There is certainly a way to print your transparencies aside from the ones you named: Ilfochrome. Do it while you still can. You can get the stuff from Freestyle via special order.
    Last edited by 2F/2F; 06-15-2011 at 02:21 AM. Click to view previous post history.
    2F/2F

    "Truth and love are my law and worship. Form and conscience are my manifestation and guide. Nature and peace are my shelter and companions. Order is my attitude. Beauty and perfection are my attack."

    - Rob Tyner (1944 - 1991)

  3. #13

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    Quote Originally Posted by KanFotog View Post
    How about Sensia?
    Not available in 120 format as used by the original poster's RB67...

    ...and withdrawn by Fuji 12 months ago, so now rather difficult to find in 35mm as well.

  4. #14
    Paul Green's Avatar
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    My vote goes for provia, don't be scared by the films latitude, if it is as difficult as people are saying to meter for then it would have been discontinued a long time ago.

  5. #15
    Roger Cole's Avatar
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    Saturation is a relative thing. Astia and E100G would have been considered quite saturated a couple of decades ago.

    I have tried to like Provia and can't seem to do so. If I want exaggerated saturation and wild color, Velvia 50 or E100VS. If I want impressive but less exaggerated color and slightly more manageable contrast, it's E100G nowadays. I like Astia for the same sorts of shots, but since I mostly shoot E6 in 35mm and Fuji discontinued it, I've really started to like E100G.

  6. #16
    mooseontheloose's Avatar
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    Agreed - why not grab a roll or two of each type and see how they go? When I first shot slides I didn't know what I was doing and 99% of them came out just fine. And when I got my first roll back, I was floored by the colours and the almost three-dimensionality I got in the slides. I never looked back (until I started shooting black and white that is).
    Rachelle

    My favorite thing is to go where I've never been. D. Arbus

  7. #17

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    I'd recommend you try them all, but for me, it's Velvia. It was one of the first films I ever shot, and I think it's easier to get right than it seems. It's easy to blow highlights, but apart from that I think it always looks pretty nice. It'll often go a bit purple, but I think for night landscapes, that only adds to it's appeal.

  8. #18
    markbarendt's Avatar
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    Provia IMO is great, nice rich color palette Suitable for most any subject.

    Velvia works well where enhanced color is part of the expectation, like fall leaves and technicolor sunsets.

    Astia works better where you don't want color competing with the subject. I'm not saying it's colors are muted, just not enhanced.

    I would though suggest that either you meter well and place your subjects carefully or that you bracket.
    Mark Barendt, Beaverton, OR

    "We do not see things the way they are. We see things the way we are." Anaïs Nin

  9. #19
    nick mulder's Avatar
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    Much discussion - care less, shoot more...

    Shall I throw in Fuji Fortia as an option ? heh heh
    Cleared the bowel problem, working on the consonants...

  10. #20
    brian steinberger's Avatar
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    When I used to shoot chromes exclusively it was always Velvia 50, then, later Velvia 100. I'm now slowly getting back into shooting color and have shot a few rolls of Provia and prefer the results to Velvia. Little less saturation, more pleasing colors. Velvia is still great for fall foliage though as someone else mentioned or anytime a "drab" scene needs a kick. But I prefer Provia to Velvia for most subjects.

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