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  1. #21

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    Everyone has their own taste, and with slide films the opinions seem to run exceptionally strong. I don't see what people like about Velvia except as a "special effect" film, but obviously lots of people see those colors and absolutely love the result, so there you have it. To my eye Provia 100F looks very natural *in* *sunlight*---it can go really blue, really quickly, in the shade, and I usually shoot it through an 81B filter to keep that under control. But basically I think this is a "jump in and try something and see what you like" situation.

    In my understanding, the contrast of a film and its latitude are intrinsically correlated---I mean, the steeper the characteristic curve is, the more an exposure error changes your results, right?---so you would expect that of the Fuji films, Astia is the most forgiving and Velvia the least, which might argue for starting with Astia. However, my experience is that you can get away with fairly sloppy technique with Provia and still get acceptable photos. I've shot a fair amount of it in old folding cameras whose shutters are of dubious accuracy, and done OK.

    -NT
    Nathan Tenny
    San Diego, CA, USA

    The lady of the house has to be a pretty swell sort of person to put up with the annoyance of a photographer.
    -The Little Technical Library, _Developing, Printing, And Enlarging_

  2. #22
    BetterSense's Avatar
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    Not having any experience in color, I'm particularly worried about the color cast issues because I don't have any color correcting filters, at least not in 77mm for my RB.
    f/22 and be there.

  3. #23
    polyglot's Avatar
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    Quit worrying and try it. If you shoot in sunlight or with flash, it will be completely fine.

  4. #24
    Athiril's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by BetterSense View Post
    Not having any experience in color, I'm particularly worried about the color cast issues because I don't have any color correcting filters, at least not in 77mm for my RB.
    Get E100VS for the shade then imho.

  5. #25
    brucemuir's Avatar
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    If you have any reds in the scene then I'll agree with Atheril and say E100VS.
    Reds that will blow your mind.

    I used to be Provia, Provia, Provia.
    All the time.
    It will indeed go blue if you don't watch things.

    Good info here from everyone, well except maybe one
    Have a great trip.

  6. #26
    benjiboy's Avatar
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    I think I would choose Provia for an all round general purpose slide film myself.
    Ben

  7. #27
    polyglot's Avatar
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    Provia goes blue:


    though one should keep in mind that it's blue because the light is blue; the colour here is accurate.

  8. #28
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    I use Velvia 50 & 100 for my 5x4 work, in conjunction with a spot meter, metering for shadow detail, and I am very happy with the results. The Velvia 100 is preferable for photographing the Arctic tundra and similar scenes. The key thing to remember with Velvia (or Redvia, as Joe Cornish calls it) is that it seems over sensitive to UV.... so a UV filter is recommended. With a UV filter attached my blue skies remain blue rather than changing to magenta! The magenta can look quite nice though.....

    On this side of the pond (UK) Velvia is highly regarded (for large format photography anyway) as it gives rich colouration and good contrast. It is proportionately more difficult to use than Provia but the results are more appealing to the UK market. If you have no experience of using tranny film then Provia would be a good starting point, especially if you are not too confidenct in your metering skills. Velvia rewards skilled use.
    Last edited by Thingy; 06-16-2011 at 10:52 AM. Click to view previous post history.
    The Thing

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    Film Cameras currently used:
    Large/Stort-format: Ebony 45SU (field camera), Medium/Medlem-format: Mamiya 7, Hasselblad 503CW
    35mm/Små format: Nikon: F4, D800 (yes digital, I know)

  9. #29

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    Looking through the thread,doesn't seem anyone has mentioned Velvia 100F?. I would guess this film is easier to meter than RVP 50 or 100. I find 100F to have high contrast with good saturation,that is not as intense as Velvia 50 and 100.

    To the OP. If you like the look of Kodachrome, then i would say Ektachrome 100G and Velvia/Provia 100F could be pleasing to your eye.

  10. #30

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    Quote Originally Posted by polyglot View Post
    Provia goes blue:

    though one should keep in mind that it's blue because the light is blue; the colour here is accurate.
    So, it doesn't "go blue" then.....
    2F/2F

    "Truth and love are my law and worship. Form and conscience are my manifestation and guide. Nature and peace are my shelter and companions. Order is my attitude. Beauty and perfection are my attack."

    - Rob Tyner (1944 - 1991)

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