Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 69,872   Posts: 1,520,117   Online: 864
      
Page 4 of 5 FirstFirst 12345 LastLast
Results 31 to 40 of 46
  1. #31
    brucemuir's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Metro DC area, USA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    2,265
    Images
    4
    If you shoot with uncorrected (UV) flashtubes it will look blueish also.

  2. #32
    2F/2F's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    Los Angeles, CA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    8,008
    Images
    4
    In other words, if the light is blueish, it goes blueish.

    Sounds like it is "accurate" to me.

    Saying that it goes blue in blue light is like saying that it goes orange in orange light. Of course it does! All film does. You just usually don't see it with color neg film unless you print it yourself.

    I don't know what an unfiltered (UV) flash tube is, but Provia always looked neutral with my Sunpak and Vivitar speedlights, and with Dynalites, Normans, and Profotos.
    2F/2F

    "Truth and love are my law and worship. Form and conscience are my manifestation and guide. Nature and peace are my shelter and companions. Order is my attitude. Beauty and perfection are my attack."

    - Rob Tyner (1944 - 1991)

  3. #33
    brucemuir's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Metro DC area, USA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    2,265
    Images
    4
    Almost all flash tubes for studio strobe (monoblock or pack & head) are available in UV corrected or non UV corrected.

    The UV corrected have a slight orange/amber look to the flash element.

    The human eye corrects for this in blue sky lit scene so while it may be "accurate" it looks funky to most people/viewers.

    Correcting blue shadows has always been an issue when printing or with chromes for that matter.

  4. #34
    2F/2F's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    Los Angeles, CA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    8,008
    Images
    4
    Quote Originally Posted by brucemuir View Post
    Correcting blue shadows has always been an issue when printing or with chromes for that matter.
    Shadows are blue. Someone saying that the film "goes blue" in light that is blue is doing the film a disservice. That is all I mean.
    2F/2F

    "Truth and love are my law and worship. Form and conscience are my manifestation and guide. Nature and peace are my shelter and companions. Order is my attitude. Beauty and perfection are my attack."

    - Rob Tyner (1944 - 1991)

  5. #35

    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    San Diego, CA, USA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    2,224
    Images
    21
    Quote Originally Posted by 2F/2F View Post
    Shadows are blue. Someone saying that the film "goes blue" in light that is blue is doing the film a disservice. That is all I mean.
    I guess that's fair, but a lot of people seem to feel that Provia 100F especially captures shadows as perceptually "bluer" than they looked at the time. I don't know if that's because it's more color-accurate than our own perception is, or because its response actually skews blue at low light levels, but I think it's reasonable to point it out as a characteristic of the film that a lot of people notice when using it.

    -NT
    Nathan Tenny
    San Diego, CA, USA

    The lady of the house has to be a pretty swell sort of person to put up with the annoyance of a photographer.
    -The Little Technical Library, _Developing, Printing, And Enlarging_

  6. #36
    2F/2F's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    Los Angeles, CA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    8,008
    Images
    4
    Quote Originally Posted by ntenny View Post
    I guess that's fair, but a lot of people seem to feel that Provia 100F especially captures shadows as perceptually "bluer" than they looked at the time. I don't know if that's because it's more color-accurate than our own perception is, or because its response actually skews blue at low light levels, but I think it's reasonable to point it out as a characteristic of the film that a lot of people notice when using it.

    -NT
    That makes more sense than just saying "it goes blue" with no explanation, though I don't agree with the assessment, personally. The simple statement made along with the photo posted could really breed some incorrect assumptions about this film.

    It is a pretty neutral film, and definitely does not lean to the warm side. But like all transparency films, it should be filtered differently in different light for ideal results. As should negative film, for that matter, if one really wants "ideal" negatives. The thing as that negative film allows one to use a lot of slop and never realize it. Transparency film, being a direct positive, does not, and makes such things readily apparent to anyone. So, the films get a lot of the "blame" that should go to the photographers...especially on the Internet.
    2F/2F

    "Truth and love are my law and worship. Form and conscience are my manifestation and guide. Nature and peace are my shelter and companions. Order is my attitude. Beauty and perfection are my attack."

    - Rob Tyner (1944 - 1991)

  7. #37
    polyglot's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    South Australia
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    3,077
    Images
    12
    Quote Originally Posted by 2F/2F View Post
    So, it doesn't "go blue" then.....
    That is exactly my point. The colour is quite accurate, though people will claim that it "goes blue" because most shadow and night scenes have very blue lighting. My point in posting this particular shot was to show that while the image can look very very blue, you can tell from the white column that this colouring is not a function of the film's response.

    Certainly you can make a film that has better red sensitivity down low (does that imply a very mild crossover?) and it will look "better" for some purposes in shadows than Provia. But Provia is pretty accurate with the hues IMHO.

  8. #38
    Athiril's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Melbourne, Vic, Australia
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    2,494
    Images
    28
    I've only compared 400X and Velvia, and golly do they ever go blue, it isn't neutral, especially if you don't expose spot on, compare it to a daylight balance shot digital of the scene with the same lens, that is neutral and is accurate. It should look cold, not blue. Looking cold and looking blue are two different things. It certainly should not look monochromatic blue in the case of 400X that happened to me.

  9. #39
    brian steinberger's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Pennsylvania
    Shooter
    Med. Format RF
    Posts
    2,328
    Blog Entries
    1
    Images
    100
    After re-reading this thread it really got me thinking about what happens to our transparencies when it's time to print. Almost all of us are scanning these E-6 films now and printing either lightjet, chromira, lambda, inkjet.. etc. So any color cast or saturation differences between these films can easily be corrected for in P****S*** before printing. I could make Provia look like Velvia, or easily correct the blue cast of provia 400. So to me the choice is easy, I'm shooting Provia for its slightly lower contrast and I'll worry about everything else later.

  10. #40
    lxdude's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    Redlands, So. Calif.
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    6,573
    Quote Originally Posted by BetterSense View Post
    I normally don't shoot slide film because the only way to print it is with an internegative or that-process-that-shall-not-be-named
    Why? What's wrong with saying Ilfochrome?
    I do use a digital device in my photographic pursuits when necessary.
    When someone rags on me for using film, I use a middle digit, upraised.

Page 4 of 5 FirstFirst 12345 LastLast


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin