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  1. #11

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    Thanks for the great responses! I didn't realize that ilfochrome supplies are unobtanium which seriously bums me out. I was really looking forward to learning this film and making cibachromes. How are the serious landscape guys doing this? I really don't want to be tied to the computer and I have even less of a desire to get a digital camera. I saw online that these supplies are still available in England, I wonder if I it would be possible to get it somehow? Hazmat might be the limiting factor.

    What if everyone on this site wrote an email to Freestyle asking for it? Even though I have zero experience with it I think it would be a shame to lose such an amazing process.

    Meanwhile, I'm going to buy the home kits for e6 processing and start figuring it out. At least I can still.do that. Does anyone know how many rolls I can process with each kit?

    Thank you for your valuable insights,

    Puma
    I'm looking for;

    Leitz V35 color module
    E55 and E39 Red (090) and dark green
    Contact printing frame,
    One 11x14 tray with the pour spout corners,
    A grain focuser,
    Archival print washer 12x16 or 11x14
    Leica 12526 Rectangular hood, and hood cap for same
    Leica 12592 Hood cap
    User condition Leica 90 summicron or elmarit

  2. #12
    2F/2F's Avatar
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    Hi,

    All three Velvia varieties will behave differently. 50 is very saturated and has very warm warm hues. 100 is very saturated, but the warm hues are cooler. 100F is highly saturated, but not nearly as much as the other two kinds. It is also less contrasty IME.

    The 100F is the most "normal" of the three IME. I use it more than any of the others. I particularly like it for still life pix and twilight landscapes.

    I would put in the effort and expense for an initial test of the range of these films, and push and pull tests. It is a P.I.T.A., but it gives you so much information about the films that you can use in the future.

    I would start with a plain old bracketed towel (or any textured fabric) test, and see where your film drops off into black on the low end, and into clear (white) on the high end. That will give you a rough idea of the film's ability to hold texture on either side of middle gray.
    2F/2F

    "Truth and love are my law and worship. Form and conscience are my manifestation and guide. Nature and peace are my shelter and companions. Order is my attitude. Beauty and perfection are my attack."

    - Rob Tyner (1944 - 1991)

  3. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by 36cm2 View Post
    Benjiboy, you must be doing some serious film testing!
    Shush, don't tell my wife, IMO the only way to experience the capability of a film is "suck it and see"
    Ben

  4. #14
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    A lot of good information here and I think I will try some Velvia as well as some others discussed here. I have been exclusively using E100G and E100VS. I really like the VS for low [and warm] light.

    I should point out that Ilfochrome/Cibachrome IS STILL AVAILABLE both at a number of labs as well as the materials to print in one's own darkroom. I have used The Lab and the work is profoundly excellent. I encourage everyone to avail themselves of this process: it will keep it alive and you will never get better color prints! See the below links...

    The Lab
    Recent list of labs
    Thread

  5. #15

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    i shot a lot of velvia 120 and 4x5 film for a while ..
    extra vivid was OK but a bit on the surreal side for me ...
    so i muted the colors ( by hand not by machine ) shooting
    with ancient lenses and bellows and over exposing the film ...
    the only suggestions i would give are experiment with different
    situations --- exposing in different ways.

  6. #16
    MaximusM3's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jnanian View Post
    i shot a lot of velvia 120 and 4x5 film for a while ..
    extra vivid was OK but a bit on the surreal side for me ...
    so i muted the colors ( by hand not by machine ) shooting
    with ancient lenses and bellows and over exposing the film ...
    the only suggestions i would give are experiment with different
    situations --- exposing in different ways.
    Wow, John..that proves once again that all rules are meant to be broken...or actually NEED to be broken to achieve something unique and beautiful. Wonderful, soothing image.

  7. #17

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    thanks max !

    yeah, i agree about the rules ...
    i guess it is good to know why they are there ( kinda-sorta ) and then they should be disregard entirely !
    rules and formulas in any kind of artistic endeavor hamper creativity

    - john

  8. #18
    2F/2F's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Puma View Post
    Thanks for the great responses! I didn't realize that ilfochrome supplies are unobtanium which seriously bums me out. I was really looking forward to learning this film and making cibachromes. How are the serious landscape guys doing this? I really don't want to be tied to the computer and I have even less of a desire to get a digital camera. I saw online that these supplies are still available in England, I wonder if I it would be possible to get it somehow? Hazmat might be the limiting factor.

    What if everyone on this site wrote an email to Freestyle asking for it? Even though I have zero experience with it I think it would be a shame to lose such an amazing process.

    Meanwhile, I'm going to buy the home kits for e6 processing and start figuring it out. At least I can still.do that. Does anyone know how many rolls I can process with each kit?

    Thank you for your valuable insights,

    Puma
    You could get Ilfochrome stuff from Freestyle (via special order) and B&H last I checked. Has that changed?
    2F/2F

    "Truth and love are my law and worship. Form and conscience are my manifestation and guide. Nature and peace are my shelter and companions. Order is my attitude. Beauty and perfection are my attack."

    - Rob Tyner (1944 - 1991)

  9. #19
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    Hello, the most important question you pose, the exposure range, is often a debate in the Internet forums, although it is clearly answerred in the datasheet that you can download from the Fuji website!

    Just learn how to read the characteristic curve -- on the X axis, there is the exposure, 0.3 being one f/stop; going to right means more exposure. On the Y axis, there is the resulting density from that exposure. When the curve is going downwards steeply, the tonal separation (contrast) is high -- this is called the linear region. Or "almost linear region" -- it's up to you what you want to read from the curves!

    This almost linear range is around 6 to 7 stops with all Velvias; Velvia 50 may show a little bit more than 100 and 100F, but not much.

    OTOH, when the curve is straight horizontal line, every detail is lost. But, with slide film, the toe and shoulder are very important. This means the parts of the curve that do not produce full tonal separation but still show detail. Velvia 50 can show some detail for even up to 10 stops, but Velvia 100 and 100F are worse in this regard; they have sharper toe and shoulder.

    A basic "rule of thumb" often stated is that it's good to have sharp toe and shoulder, but this is based on the comparison where longer toe and shoulder would eat off the linear part. (And this is mostly the rule for designing color negative films, where the toe and shoulder are ignored anyway). This is not the case with Velvias, as the 50 shows as much linear part as 100 and 100F, if not even more. Therefore, the longer toe and shoulder are merely extra. In practice, this means that the Velvia 50 does not block the shadows as easily as the newer counterparts, but still show the nice high-contrast crispness in the midtones. I'm also seeing better highlight detail with Velvia 50.

    The color rendition is completely a different matter from this. I won't go into it because it is always well discussed whereas the contrast or "dynamic range" issue is dismissed.

    I have evaluated pull processing of Velvia 50 in a controlled side-by-side test and found that shooting it at 20 to 25 ISO and developing for 2 minutes less than normal in FD results in decreased contrast, decreased color saturation and increased tonal separation in both shadows and highlights. The effect is not huge but it's clearly there. I liked the results more than when shot normally. Has anyone tested this with Velvia 100 or Velvia 100F? I think it would be even more important with them to tame the contrast.
    Last edited by hrst; 06-18-2011 at 01:44 PM. Click to view previous post history.

  10. #20

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    Velvia

    Hi,

    I shoot large format velvia and read the thread - I take shots at between 0.5 and 1s with no colour correction. I take three shots - I take a shot where I have measured exposure for the foreground this over exposes the sky I take a shot at the average of the scene - this usually has some hard shadows and also over exposes the sky. Let us say that is f22 50ASA and the two exposures were 1s and 0.5s - I now shoot a shot at 1s with a graduated filter on the highlights. If you go over 4s us magenta colour correction.

    I do not consistently get a best shot i.e. it really depends on the light which one has worked but I have alwasy had a shot i want to print up. If I could only take 1 shot - i.e. only one dark slide left I would take the shot with the graduated filter.

    As to dynamic range I make it 3.67 EV - I will have to check the product guide. As you will know depends on the light how far it is plus and how far it is minus but I have never managed to exceed 3.67 EV.

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