Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 70,269   Posts: 1,534,390   Online: 863
      
Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 21
  1. #1
    Diapositivo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Rome, Italy
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    1,844

    Film refrigeration when original canister already opened

    I have just received 11 135 films which I bought with the intent of experimenting with several colour negative films. I have no problems about the fact that most of those will go in the fridge unopened and all will work fine.

    I have a problem with the 4 Rollei CN200. They are sold in a double canister, each canister contains 2 cartridges. One of the canisters arrived already opened (not a good thing considering the polyester base and the high risk of fogging). I opened the other canister myself in a stupid move, to check if there was an additional sealing, there wasn't.

    I normally put in the fridge only films which are in unopened canisters, as the canister is factory-filled with low-humidity air as far as I know. That allows the film to get inside the fridge, and out, without condensation problems, provided one lets the canister go to ambient temperature for an hour or so before opening it. If you let the canister go up to ambient temperature before opening it, condensation never happens inside the canister.

    But those two double Rollei canisters are now filled with my normal room air, let's say 55% relative humidity at 25 °C.

    Is it a wise move to put those in the fridge, or do I risk some condensation to be formed inside the canister? How bad is that for film?

    The question also applies to bulk roll film. Do you put your bulk rolls (or the entire bulk loader) in the fridge once you took them away from their factory-sealed canister?

    Thanks
    Fabrizio
    Fabrizio Ruggeri fine art photography site: http://fabrizio-ruggeri.artistwebsites.com
    Stock images at Imagebroker: http://www.imagebroker.com/#/search/ib_fbr

  2. #2
    segedi's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    Calgary, Alberta, Canada
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    344
    Images
    2
    If you plan to experiment with these films soon, I don't see the need to refrigerate any of them. I've kept most of my stock in the freezer, but with the 40 some rolls I plan to shoot before they expire in a year or two, I've kept those rolls out of the fridge.

    I know this doesn't solve your original question, but maybe it does!
    -----------------------

    Segedi.com

  3. #3
    Steve Smith's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Ryde, Isle of Wight
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    8,591
    Images
    122
    Quote Originally Posted by Diapositivo View Post
    as the canister is factory-filled with low-humidity air as far as I know.
    I work in a factory which has low humidity rooms (for manufacturing medical products) and I have also visited Ilford's factory.

    I might be wrong but I would say that as far as Ilford is concerned, their films are packed in a normal humidity environment. Not sure about other manufacturers but I would be surprised if they packed in a low humidity room.


    Steve.
    "People who say things won't work are a dime a dozen. People who figure out how to make things work are worth a fortune" - Dave Rat.

  4. #4
    kb3lms's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    Reading, PA USA
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    696
    Images
    5
    Oftentimes I put exposed film that I will not be able to process for some time back in a can in the fridge. For example, E-6 films or sometimes C-41 films that I like to process when I have 5 or 6 of them to do. I have not noticed any problems. Actually, I have also put them back in the freezer without ill effects. Follow the same recommendations as when opening them fresh. I will add that I normally do keep all of my film packed in ziploc bags. (Hate to get film mixed in with frozen peas!)

    Maybe a little "dust-off" spray in the can would be a good idea, IDK. Haven't tried it.

  5. #5

    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    Central Florida, USA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    3,920
    Simple fix is to put it in a bag with a descant overnight before placing it in a frig. I do that with all films, opened or not. I'm not sure if it's necessary though.
    Develop, stop, fix.... wait.... where's my film?

  6. #6
    M.A.Longmore's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    New York
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    1,847
    Images
    15
    Quote Originally Posted by tkamiya View Post
    Simple fix is to put it in a bag with a descant overnight before placing it in a frig. I do that with all films, opened or not. I'm not sure if it's necessary though.
    .
    Even simpler, I throw in a handful of uncooked rice.

    Ron
    .

  7. #7

    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    Central Florida, USA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    3,920
    Quote Originally Posted by M.A.Longmore View Post
    .
    Even simpler, I throw in a handful of uncooked rice.

    Ron
    .

    That'll only work with Japanese film.
    Develop, stop, fix.... wait.... where's my film?

  8. #8
    Diapositivo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Rome, Italy
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    1,844
    Thanks to all. I see that I am probably worrying too much. My interest depends also on the fact that if I like Rollei CN200 (or CR200) I can find very cheap bulk rolls of both products and I wondered about refrigerating an open bulk roll.

    I like the rice trick.

    I don't know what a "descant" is in this context (unless I have to find a contratenor and put him in the fridge, but it seems impractical ).
    Fabrizio Ruggeri fine art photography site: http://fabrizio-ruggeri.artistwebsites.com
    Stock images at Imagebroker: http://www.imagebroker.com/#/search/ib_fbr

  9. #9

    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    Central Florida, USA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    3,920
    Concerning descant, I put all of my film and paper in a ziploc bag, then put a packet of descant in it. It may be unnecessary but that's how I store my stuff.
    Develop, stop, fix.... wait.... where's my film?

  10. #10

    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    North America just north of that sharp right turn North America makes on the Atlantic coast.
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    602
    Simpler solution: Calculate the volume of gas that the container will hold, then use that to calculate the volume of liquid water that could condense would be in that volume of gas, the term negligible comes to mind. I am recommending that you do the calculation not to be a jerk, but so that you will have real peace of mind, your concept is sound, but at the volumes you are talking about it should not be a problem. Don't forget to calculate for the displacement of the film.

    I say toss it in the fridge, and if your really worried just leave the container open enough to allow air to get into and out of the container then seal it after it has been cold a few days and all that water is gone. You would want to put the containers in a light sealed box, or a dark bag to do this just in case.
    "Would you like it if someone that painted in oils told you that you were not making portraits because you were using a camera?"
    "Shouldn't it be more about the joy of producing and viewing the photo than what you paid for the camera?"

    Me

Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin