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  1. #21
    hpulley's Avatar
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    The 10L kits dilute to 10L. The developer 10L kit is actually about 1L total of concentrate in 3 bottles while the 10L blix kit is 2 bigger bottles but still much less than 10L.
    Harry Pulley - Visit the BLIND PRINT EXCHANGE FORUM

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  2. #22

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    Blix is two 2 liter bottles, but one only has 1.4 liters in it. Dev is three bottles, 2x500 and 1 222ml bottle. Although I'm pretty sure I saw some colour chemicals that are ready to use. Makes shipping expensive.
    Bob

  3. #23

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    That's good news. I'll be ordering today. I believe I'll take a pass on the developer starter though, based on what PE says in post #11 in another thread RA4 problems. Apparently it is not necessary to use it, and not recommended if you are processing at room temp. I won't be processing at room temp, but I don't see any reason to use the starter if it's not actually necessary. It does make one wonder why it exists if it's not necessary.

    Then based on what stevewillard says in post #6 in thread Questions for printing RA4 at room temperature, I may also buy some Kodak Ektacolor Developer Additive KP126497. And if I decide to use Trebla's blix, I'll get the Trecon Topping Solution too.

  4. #24

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    The starter is for replenished systems, in effect it makes a fresh tank of dev/replenisher look and process like "used" developer, you might notice some colour shifts as your developer ages and is replenished and stabilizes.
    Bob

  5. #25

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    Hmmm. My use of the CP-31 will be intermmitant. I may use it continuously for a couple or three weeks, then put it aside and not come back to it for a couple or three months. My color work will be woven in with my normal work, life, and black and white printing.

    During the periods of continuous use, I expect that the CP-31 replenisher unit will keep the solutions stable once they get to the aged and stabilized stage. But after each lengthy hiatus, I'll doubtless be starting with fresh developer for the next period of regular usage. With this pattern of usage, I gather that I would suffer the color shifts during developer aging each time. To avoid that, I could mix each new batch with the starter added.

    If my reasoning is correct, then it would be advisable to add the starter back to my shopping list.

    Does that make sense?
    Last edited by SkipA; 07-15-2011 at 01:53 PM. Click to view previous post history.

  6. #26

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    255.255.255.255

    I've been using the Jobo/Tetenal kit in hand inversion tanks at room temp... whats the advantage to using the Kodak chemistry?
    ~ Michelle

  7. #27

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    mfratt, I started out talking about C-41 chemistry, an old Jobo Tetenal C41 Press Kit, specifically, then I switched to a discussion of RA4 printing. Now back to film processing, which gets this thread back on track (not that I mind it wandering, especially when I'm the one who instigates it) ...

    The most often cited advantage of using the Kodak C41 chemicals that I have read on this forum is that the bleach and fix are separate steps, and this is supposed to yield more stable negatives with less chance of color changes (I think) due to under bleaching or under fixing. I think that's the gist of it, but there's probably more to it than that. There are many excellent posts by Photo Engineer (PE) and others who discuss this in far more technical detail than I ever could.

    A disadvantage of using (or attempting to use) Kodak C41 chemistry is that it isn't available in small quantities, there are at least three different formulations intended for different types of processing, all components are separately orderable, and figuring out exactly which components you need to combine together is challenging (for many of us). There are myriad lists of the CAT numbers you need to get, all different (slight exageration).

    Even more difficult is sourcing all the chemicals you need in small enough quantities to be reasonable. The bleach ships with a hazmat fee. Some merchants won't ship it at all (B&H). You may not be able to source all the components from one merchant. The merchants who sell it retail are often out of one component or another. But many people say that if you can sort out all the myriad CAT numbers and sourcing issues, Kodak is the best way to go for C41 processing. That's obviously a subjective evaluation.

    I plan to switch to Kodak chemicals for my C41 processing after I use up the Tetenal kit I have now and the Arista C41 kit I recently bought.
    Last edited by SkipA; 07-15-2011 at 04:56 PM. Click to view previous post history.

  8. #28
    Trasselblad's Avatar
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    I've seen Tetenal/Unicolor powders go bad from oxidising and/or moisture. But only when opened or transferred to a zip lock bag. Once, I was stupid enough to try and "split" a kit in to half its volume, which sort of worked, but when I grabbed the remainder of the developer and tried to mix it a few weeks later, it was difficult to dissolve and instead of becoming "iced tea" looked like a sludgy glass of vitamin C solubles with a lot sticky black specks. Almost ruined my measuring and storage gear, since those black things were real difficult to clean off.

  9. #29

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    Thankfully I didn't have that problem. But there were brown specks all throughout the developer powder before I mixed it up. It looked sort of like dark brown sesame seeds, or rodent poo. It mixed up just fine, no problem except for turbidity that disappeared after a half hour. No sediment.

  10. #30

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    Does anyone know how long these chemicals will remain fresh unopened?

    Pricing at Adorama for one each of the above comes to about $98 plus $41 shipping. I could get 4 times the developer and bleach (4x10L each) plus one each of the othe two from Pakor for $145 plus unknown shipping cost. Four times as much chemicals for 1.5 times the cost. That's a tremendous savings. But only if the unopened bottles of concentrates last a long time.

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