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  1. #1

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    CROSS PROCESS KODAK 400 CN - advice needed

    Not sure if this is the right venue.

    I would like to know if anyone have tried to cross process kodak 400 CN chromatic film (process as E6). And if so, what are the requirements, i.e., does the film needs to be pushed. The film was exposed at 400 ISO.

    A decade ago, i use to have Ilford black and white chromatic film (I think it was the XP2 film) cross processed and it produced beautiful monochromatic slides. I remenbered pushing the film was involved, but can't exactly remember how much it was pushed.

    Any input would be much appreciated

  2. #2
    Bob Carnie's Avatar
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    If memory serves me correct you will need to push (extend the development time to get great results) I managed a E6 labs in the late 80;s and this was common.
    You should do a ring around, normal, under , over,
    Then as the lab to clip test , Normal, push 1 , push 2 push 3 push 4.
    This will cost you a bit but you will get results.
    If you are processing yourself then I would use whole rolls with ring around experiments.
    Very lovely results can be had,,,,, each film has its own look so first off I would get the exposure dev correct .
    then move onto new films.

    have fun

  3. #3

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    thanks, will try that out.

  4. #4
    michaelbsc's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by photoworks68 View Post
    thanks, will try that out.
    But won't you still have the orange mask to deal with?


    I think the Ilford film was clear and designed to be a B&W negative. But my understanding, perhaps completely wrong, is that the Kodak film is designed to be printed on RA-4 paper, hence the base is not clear but has the orange.

    Or will that beach out in the E-6 beach?

    It should be obvious by now this isn't my strength! I'm looking for information.
    Michael Batchelor
    Industrial Informatics, Inc.
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    The camera catches light. The photographer catches life.

  5. #5
    Diapositivo's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by michaelbsc View Post
    But won't you still have the orange mask to deal with?
    I think the original poster means the film Kodak BW400CN, it's a panchromatic black & white film, a "chromogenic" film as they call them, to be normally developed in C-41 process to give an unmasked negative. The OP wants to cross-process it in E-6 to obtain monochromatic slides.
    Fabrizio Ruggeri fine art photography site: http://fabrizio-ruggeri.artistwebsites.com
    Stock images at Imagebroker: http://www.imagebroker.com/#/search/ib_fbr

  6. #6
    Bob Carnie's Avatar
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    The OP should end up with an Positive, although possibly very wierd positive.
    I do not think that the image will be a perfect BW positive, rather an interesting image.
    The colour negative films all had different looks, all depending on exposure and development time. Once someone nailed their balance the formula was pretty predictable.
    John Callow here on APUG has done as much cross processing of E6 film into negative as anyone on the planet. I am not sure how much of the neg to trans work he has done.
    but hopefully he will chime in... report this post and he is sure to see it as he is one of the main cahoonas here on APUG.
    Quote Originally Posted by michaelbsc View Post
    But won't you still have the orange mask to deal with?


    I think the Ilford film was clear and designed to be a B&W negative. But my understanding, perhaps completely wrong, is that the Kodak film is designed to be printed on RA-4 paper, hence the base is not clear but has the orange.

    Or will that beach out in the E-6 beach?

    It should be obvious by now this isn't my strength! I'm looking for information.

  7. #7
    michaelbsc's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Diapositivo View Post
    I think the original poster means the film Kodak BW400CN, it's a panchromatic black & white film, a "chromogenic" film as they call them, to be normally developed in C-41 process to give an unmasked negative. The OP wants to cross-process it in E-6 to obtain monochromatic slides.
    "an unmasked negative"

    That's my question. I think the Kodak product is not unmasked like the Ilford product.

    I may be completely wrong, but my understanding is that the Kodak film gives a monochrome negative that is designed to print well to RA-4 color paper. While the Ilford product is designed to give a dye cloud based B&W negative for use with traditional monochrome paper.

    Does anyone know for sure?

    I hope the OP fills us in with the results, good or bad, so we'll know. The film might be pretty interesting to play with. It's almost always hanging in CVS when I buy my occasional overpriced TriX.

    MB
    Michael Batchelor
    Industrial Informatics, Inc.
    www.industrialinformatics.com

    The camera catches light. The photographer catches life.

  8. #8
    MattKing's Avatar
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    Like Ilford XP-2, Kodak BW400CN results in a "dye cloud based" negative. The negative is also monochromatic. The difference is that the negative includes the orange mask common to most C41 colour films. This makes it easier for simple one-hour photo labs to print monochrome images on RA4 colour paper.

    The mask tends to interfere with printing on to regular Black and White photo papers, but it is possible. Graded papers may work best.
    Matt

    “Photography is a complex and fluid medium, and its many factors are not applied in simple sequence. Rather, the process may be likened to the art of the juggler in keeping many balls in the air at one time!”

    Ansel Adams, from the introduction to The Negative - The New Ansel Adams Photography Series / Book 2

  9. #9
    Diapositivo's Avatar
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    Michael, I now understand what you meant, I thought you thought the film was colour because the OP defined it as 400CN chromatic film and I myself thought for a moment it was a colour film the post was about, only to think that a colour negative, cross-processed in E-6, should give colours of some kind, so I checked the film characteristics, got it was B&W, and thought you had made the same reasoning.
    Fabrizio Ruggeri fine art photography site: http://fabrizio-ruggeri.artistwebsites.com
    Stock images at Imagebroker: http://www.imagebroker.com/#/search/ib_fbr

  10. #10
    michaelbsc's Avatar
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    So if it is cross processed in E6 chemicals will the beach remove the orange mask?
    Michael Batchelor
    Industrial Informatics, Inc.
    www.industrialinformatics.com

    The camera catches light. The photographer catches life.

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