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  1. #11
    markbarendt's Avatar
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    The other thing to remember Albert is that those two lost stops may or may not be important in a given shot.

    If from experience and/or testing you know where the limits are and can reliably meter to place those limits you can use that "latitude" to your advantage with or without a push.
    Mark Barendt, Ignacio, CO

    "We do not see things the way they are. We see things the way we are." Anaïs Nin

  2. #12

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    I had a go at pushing to 3200, and noticed that the shots that were exposed correctly for 3200 came out none too bad, but the ones that were already underexposed at 3200 had a very green tinge.

    In that experiment, I developed the film for 1600 (2 stop push rather than 3), so seems like 2 stops off = green tinge ?

  3. #13
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    It depends a lot on color correction introduced during printing and / or during scanning. See my repost of one of the original photos.

    PE

  4. #14

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    I'm gunna try the next roll at 2 full stops pushed. I also forgot, I was shooting daylight film in a gym at a school, so my colors will definately be off.

  5. #15
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    Studio tungsten lights are 3200K, practical tungsten lights are much lower, 2800K and down.

    A 2 stop push should be 4m 15s, 3m 45s is 1 stop.



    Quote Originally Posted by Sirius Glass View Post
    If you want ISO 1600, why didn't you start with Porta 800?
    Well according to the curves, it appears Portra 400 is faster than Portra 800.


    Quote Originally Posted by polyglot View Post
    It looks like the blue layer has completely failed to expose there, or you've scanned it badly.

    I see all these "Portra at 1600 is great" posts, but frankly they all look pretty bad (no dynamic range, bad colour, washed-out, tinted shadows) to me compared to Portra at 400. Sure, there's an image, but it doesn't mean the film achieved that speed or that it looks good.


    OCAU Melb Photowalk Week 2 #6 by athiril, on Flickr


    Portra 400 rated at 1600, correctly treated is great at N+2 development, and still very nice at N development, N+1 development wouldn't be a problem here, the OP has done something wrong to get such poor results.


    OP; how did you develop? Stable temp? Re-used tetenal where 3:45 doesn't become a push? The image looks heavily abused, and judging by the histogram that's full of spikes and gaps and exaggerated noise and grain looks like you had a thin ranged image with over-sharpening that's also looks like it's been improperly developed.
    Last edited by Athiril; 07-29-2011 at 09:46 AM. Click to view previous post history.

  6. #16

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    Quote Originally Posted by Athiril View Post
    A 2 stop push should be 4m 15s, 3m 45s is 1 stop.



    Well according to the curves, it appears Portra 400 is faster than Portra 800.






    OCAU Melb Photowalk Week 2 #6 by athiril, on Flickr

    Nice. I just remember seeing someone post that they set their camera for ISO 1600 AND adjusted the eV of the camera... never understood that, both do the same thing effectively, or worst, could cancel either other out.

    Anyways, I'd like to figure this out, I've been asked by a friend to shoot a candle lit wedding and she'd like it in film.

  7. #17
    Athiril's Avatar
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    I'd like to clarify I was reading the Kodak charts wrong, as there is a typo on the Porta 800 curve, it reads 0, -1, -3, -2. :/

    I never noticed that before.

    edit: if the curves are to be believed, Portra 800 is 2 and 1/3 stops faster than Portra 400 (in my intepretation of the curves)



    Quote Originally Posted by AlbertZeroK View Post
    Nice. I just remember seeing someone post that they set their camera for ISO 1600 AND adjusted the eV of the camera... never understood that, both do the same thing effectively, or worst, could cancel either other out.

    Anyways, I'd like to figure this out, I've been asked by a friend to shoot a candle lit wedding and she'd like it in film.


    Exposure becomes more critical. Exposure technique should be spot on for pushing Portra to make the most of it, otherwise it's a hit and miss affair and you're wasting your time.

    See if you scrounge up an incident meter, otherwise in the same light you can use bleached printer paper (the type for offices etc) to fill the frame in the camera, and increase exposure another 2 and 2/3rds of a stop to get close enough to incident metering.

    I personally don't like the metering skin idea and adding a stop, I don't find it consistent, nor do I find +1 stop agreeing with an incident meter or metering off a grey card, great amount of variation over the skin of one person depending where you take it from.

    IE; set your camera meter to ISO 250, and take readings from said paper, and it should be around incident metering for the same light at ISO 1600. Although I may increase exposure another 2/3rds of a stop to compensate for tungsten light.
    Last edited by Athiril; 07-29-2011 at 10:12 AM. Click to view previous post history.

  8. #18
    Sirius Glass's Avatar
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    Athiril, thank you for taking time to clarify your posts. I was having trouble seeing what you saw in post #15, but post #17 cleared that up. I use Portra 800 if I think that the lighting will be poor, but I think it is grainer than Porta 400.
    Warning!! Handling a Hasselblad can be harmful to your financial well being!

    Nothing beats a great piece of glass!

    I leave the digital work for the urologists and proctologists.

  9. #19
    Athiril's Avatar
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    As for candle light... are you friends with NASA or Stanley Kubrick? If so you're in luck. If not then your tripod is your friend.

    Otherwise I'd also 'cheat' with some weak ceiling bounce flash fill. Definitely an incident flash meter.

    Also I dont suppose you can get your hands on Vision3 500T 5219 since you're shooting 35mm? For tungsten balanced things, and candle light it may do much nicer.

  10. #20

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    I've had great luck pushing Portra 400. This was Portra 400 shot at 1600, and push-processed to 800:





    Scanned off a Fuji Frontier.

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