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  1. #11
    holmburgers's Avatar
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    Without really knowing the answer to your question... can you even adjust the meter on these cameras?

    Have you used the camera as it is?

    I've never heard of using these guides to recalibrate a meter honestly. It seems like a grey card would do the trick.. but maybe I'm missing something?

    If the meter works, just use it!
    If you are the big tree, we are the small axe

  2. #12

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    Quote Originally Posted by holmburgers View Post
    Without really knowing the answer to your question... can you even adjust the meter on these cameras?

    Have you used the camera as it is?

    I've never heard of using these guides to recalibrate a meter honestly. It seems like a grey card would do the trick.. but maybe I'm missing something?

    If the meter works, just use it!
    I was talking about adjusting my flasmeter to match the actual results of my camera so that I would know that evey measuring I take with my flasmeter will result in a good exposure on a pic taken with my film camera.

  3. #13
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    I have one of the macbeth color charts if ya need it.
    K.S. Klain

  4. #14
    Photo Engineer's Avatar
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    NO! Not if your camera is in good operating condition. It is sufficient to check the camera against another meter or metering camera to see if the exposure is reasonably clsose (within 1/3 stop or better). Also, it would be "normal" to overexpose negative films by 1/3 stop.

    PE

  5. #15
    MattKing's Avatar
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    The advantage of using the chart and grey scale is that it gives you a constant.

    If you are going to do a lot of studio work, or want to do production printing of large quantities of similar photos (think school photos) then including the chart and grey scale in a test scene allows you to easily duplicate results from session to session and shot to shot.

    The best way to calibrate a camera meter is to use a known subject, and a standardized approach to metering it. Then expose the film at a series of exposures above, at and below the exposure recommended by the meter (aka "bracketing). Then compare the results to the original subject to determine whether the meter recommended exposure works best for your purposes, or whether slightly more or less exposure should be used in the future.

    The Color Separation Guide and Grey Scale together make for an excellent and re-usable "known subject", so in that way they are useful. Other similar things can be used instead.
    Matt

    “Photography is a complex and fluid medium, and its many factors are not applied in simple sequence. Rather, the process may be likened to the art of the juggler in keeping many balls in the air at one time!”

    Ansel Adams, from the introduction to The Negative - The New Ansel Adams Photography Series / Book 2

  6. #16
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    Flash meters often do have an adjustment at the back but almost certainly you should just leave it alone or set to zero. I would go out in Sunny-16 conditions and see that the meter reads that as expected. Shoot a test roll (with shots between -2 and +2 stops at 0.5 stop intervals) and only worry about adjusting if you have exposure issues.

  7. #17
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    Actually, if you want a precise reference every time, well, shoot 1 shot of the chart at the head end of a roll and one at the tail end of a roll. That way you know not only end to end process uniformity, but you know the absolute of the exposure used every time with every batch of film.

    But, that is not necessary unless you are doing precision work.

    PE

  8. #18

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    I would not check your meter that way. It makes no sense, because a gray card does not reflect the same amount of light that most meters call middle gray. The card reflects 18 percent, while most meters are designed for around 12 percent. Thus, if you calibrate your meter to a gray card, you will always be using EIs that are unnecessarily low.

    The charts are great for finding filter packs, as well as for finding out the color rendering and the rough contrast of films, however.
    Last edited by 2F/2F; 08-04-2011 at 08:12 PM. Click to view previous post history.
    2F/2F

    "Truth and love are my law and worship. Form and conscience are my manifestation and guide. Nature and peace are my shelter and companions. Order is my attitude. Beauty and perfection are my attack."

    - Rob Tyner (1944 - 1991)

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