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  1. #21

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    I think Athiril is talking about something I once said. I shoot photos of old people - Ektar exaggerates the ruddy complexion and makes faces look like they're glowing with bluster. Portra tones down the ruddiness and flatters faces. Old people like this effect but they don't like to see their ruddy, patchy faces glowing like they've had too much sun or alcohol. However, if you're photographing pale skinned young kids I'll bet even Fortia would render the skin nicely.
    Steve.

  2. #22

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    Pro labs in Mpls have been dropping like flies.

    National Camera does c41 35mm in house, I believe everything else goes to Universal. West does C41 35mm in house, don't know about 120.

    I haven't used Universal very much recently (maybe 1-2 rolls of E6 in the last year), but I'd be comfortable using them. I think they do enough volume to keep fresh, but no so much that they lose sight of what they're doing.

    I think Mpls Photo Center may do C41 too.
    "Far more critical than what we know or do not know is what we do not want to know." - Eric Hoffer

  3. #23
    Athiril's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by bblhed View Post
    Ektar 100 is a great film, and I have had good results from both Dwains photo, and Milford Photo with 120 format when I had it processed and scanned by both of these places.

    Something I have not had good luck with when using Ektar 100 is scanning myself. I don't know what equipment you have, but if your thinking flatbed scanner at home think again. Let the people that do it all the time and have the right equipment that gets calibrated regularly scan this film for you. Having the lab scan the film is only a few dollars and we are talking about a handful of rolls that you will only be shooting for this once in a lifetime event. If you don't like the lab's scans you can always scan yourself, but once you get your film from the lab it is a lot harder to get them to scan it.

    It's a user issue not a scanner issue, it takes about 10 seconds to dial in corrections. The image I posted was scanned on a flatbed with the scan utility it shipped with.

    Bigger issue is using poor quality monitor that isn't calibrated. You can't see what you're actually correcting to.

  4. #24
    Coffeehound's Avatar
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    I have had some really good results from The Darkroom out west in CA. I thought they were advertising here but can't find any links. I would suggest that you click on any of the many partners and or sponsors and such here on the board. They are committing their money time and good name to help keep this board alive.
    Jackie
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    Nikon N90 w/ 100 - 300 AF lens, 24-50 AF, 35-70 AF
    Mamiya C220 80mm f2.8, 180mm f4.5, 135mm f4.5, 65mm f6.5

    Three Sony Mavica Digital cameras, and a Fuji FinePix S2800HD I got after the partner died.. HP Photosmart E327
    and some Bushnell Binoculars with digit camera built in.
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  5. #25

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    Quote Originally Posted by Coffeehound View Post
    I have had some really good results from The Darkroom out west in CA.
    Do you mean these guys:

    http://www.darkroomlab.com/

    That's the lab I use and have been happy with them for many years!

    I didn't know they are sponsors... but they should seriously consider that if they are not.

  6. #26

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    Quote Originally Posted by Athiril View Post
    It's a user issue not a scanner issue, it takes about 10 seconds to dial in corrections. The image I posted was scanned on a flatbed with the scan utility it shipped with.

    Bigger issue is using poor quality monitor that isn't calibrated. You can't see what you're actually correcting to.
    Maybe you are lucky enough to have a good scanner that shipped with nice software, I am not. I have software that can correct the color as well, but if I have it scanned by a lab I don't have to correct it at all. I don't bother any more, even for 35mm if I want Ektar scanned I have the lab do it. I have no problems with any other film but Ektar. I believed this was a user or software problem, I even tried using Viewscan and still had to adjust after scanning, now I just let the people with the $30,000 scanner do it. I like my Canoscan 8800f, but it does not scan Ektar 100 well, Portra, Gold, B&W of all sorts work fine so I know it is not me, it is something to do with the way Ektar and my scanner interact. If it was me all my scans would need heavy correction, they do not.
    "Would you like it if someone that painted in oils told you that you were not making portraits because you were using a camera?"
    "Shouldn't it be more about the joy of producing and viewing the photo than what you paid for the camera?"

    Me

  7. #27

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    Quote Originally Posted by mgb74 View Post
    Pro labs in Mpls have been dropping like flies.

    National Camera does c41 35mm in house, I believe everything else goes to Universal. West does C41 35mm in house, don't know about 120.

    I haven't used Universal very much recently (maybe 1-2 rolls of E6 in the last year), but I'd be comfortable using them. I think they do enough volume to keep fresh, but no so much that they lose sight of what they're doing.

    I think Mpls Photo Center may do C41 too.

    Last I knew Mpls Photo Center is only processing B&W and dropped C41 for some reason. They were probably the last place to do C-41 dip & dunk.

    I skip National Camera and go straight to Universal Color for my processing. They're great to work with, and the quality is excellent. They're the only place for E-6, aside from going to St.Cloud. They just can't do a C-41 push, and I've been unimpressed with their scanning (even the larger file size is small to me.)

    As for Ektar; It's a great film if you don't mind colour inaccuracy. I mean, it has great punchy semi-retro colours, but it's been very temperamental to me. I cannot trust that film to give repeatable results and I've stopped using it.

  8. #28

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    If you are looking for a photo lab search my photo lab directory photomfa.com . Having said that, most labs will do a good job with Ektar because it is so scanable. Even my horrible local riteaid will do good work with it

  9. #29

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    Ektar is a very predicatable, reliable, and accurate film if you understand it. It is obviously not a low
    saturation muddied-up film engineered to minimize flesh-tone blemishes. Color inaccuracies in the shadows can be corrected using simple color-balancing filtration just like in a studio using a color temp meter. If the scene contains mixed lighting, some of it in open sun and some in deep shade, well then you'll get an
    inevitable mixed result. Scanning small format Ektar negatives requires more finesse than large ones because you're sampling size in smaller, and in general, there is the risk of portions of the three respective
    dye curves being unequally represented - in effect, you're changing the perceived shape of the curve in
    one way or another. This isn't the fault of the film but an side effect of a less than ideal scan. I print optically, directly from the negative, so this is not an issue, and I can see the real characteristics of the
    film without this kind of bias. However, a contrast-up or contrast-down unsharp mask can be used to offset saturation issues per magnification, and significantly, these will also affect color balance by controlling the skew of the respective curve. It's a little more involved than I can explain here, but just
    part of "psychoanalyzing" any new film.

  10. #30
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    I shoot at box speed and send to Reedy photo lab in St Pete Fl. they excell at 120. Be certain to tell them how you want it processed, cut or rolled up andif you want proofs and or scans and at what resolution. They are wonderful with 120 and 35mm. Used them for years.

    Lee

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